15 Must-See Micro-Hotels Around the World

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Any New Yorker will tell you that there is a real love-hate dynamic about living in the city. The glamorous nightlife, delicious cheap eats, and one-of-a-kind boutiques come with a price, namely never-ending construction, traffic, high prices, and a fast-paced attitude. If you or your travel companions can't get on board with some of New York's quirks, maybe it's best to fuggedaboudit for your next vacation.
Slide 1 of 16: Lyons, ColoradoThe aptly named Wee Casa bills itself as the world's largest tiny house resort, with 22 unique tiny homes situated at the gateway to the Rockies.Photo courtesy Wee Casa Tiny House Resort
Slide 2 of 16: Narita, JapanThe first Nine Hours opened in 2009, and while it's part of the Japanese capsule hotel phenomenon that started in the '70s, this chic, modern version helped kickstart the modern micro-hotel trend. The people behind Nine Hours asked a simple question—what do you really need in an overnight stay in a busy urban center? A place to shower. One hour. Check. A place to sleep. Seven hours. Check. And somewhere to get dressed the next day. One hour. Check. Nine Hours has it all, in about as compact a space as you might imagine.
Slide 3 of 16: Brooklyn, New YorkPod Brooklyn isn't the first Pod micro-hotel in New York, but it does have one of the most desirable addresses for its target millennial audience—smack dab in the middle of uber-trendy Williamsburg. Each of the 249 rooms is roughly 100 square feet, most with twin bunks or a queen. And what the hotel lacks in square footage per room it makes up for in free wi-fi, rooftop gardens, delicious food and cocktails. Additional Pod hotels are across the East River in Manhattan and down in D.C.Photo courtesy Pod Brooklyn
Slide 4 of 16: Paris, FranceLike Nine Hours, and certain Moxy locations, Yotel cuts straight to the chase with its airport-based "airside" locations. The Yotel Paris Charles de Gaulle has cabins bookable by the hour in Terminal 2E.Photo courtesy Yotel
Slide 5 of 16: SingaporeThe first Yotel in Asia, Yotel Singapore, is on the other side of the spectrum—a nod toward luxury, but in spare, 175-square-foot rooms right on the scene-y Orchard Road.Photo courtesy Yotel
Slide 6 of 16: New York, New YorkWhen it comes to micro-accommodations in New York, The Jane Hotel is in a class by itself. Originally built in 1908, the cabin-like rooms were meant for sailors.Photo courtesy The Jane Hotel
Slide 7 of 16: Perth, AustraliaTribe Perth is the first micro-hotel in Australia—though the concept is catching on Down Under. Each of its efficient and beautifully designed 126 rooms is fewer than 200 square feet (18 square meters).Photo credit Earl Carter, courtesy Tribe Perth
Slide 8 of 16: New Orleans, LouisianaThe U.S. flagship outpost of Marriott's Moxy boutique hotels, in New Orleans, is less micro, per se, but definitely all millennial. The concept is the same—smaller, pared-down rooms, with ample communal space and endlessly Instagrammable decor.Photo courtesy Marriott International
Slide 9 of 16: Frankfurt, GermanySimilarly, the Moxy Eschborn Frankfurt delivers on the chain's promise—big offerings in a small footprint. And pops of hot pink.Photo courtesy Marriott International
Slide 10 of 16: Tepoztlan, MéxicoWhat is a Tubohotel? Exactly what it sounds like—a set of tubes, stacked in pyramid form, each with queen beds. This truly unique micro-hotel sits on an organic farm in the village of Tepoztlan, 45 minutes south of Mexico City.Photo courtesy Tubohotel
Slide 11 of 16: New York, New YorkThe impossibly chic Arlo NoMad maintains a warm, modern-minimalist vibe in the rooms, which are around 150 square feet, max. The big draws are the ample communal spaces—including what the U.K. Telegraph calls "probably the best Empire State selfie spot in all of Manhattan." A sister property is just south, in Soho.Photo courtesy Arlo NoMad
Slide 12 of 16: London, EnglandThere are three citizenM locations across London alone, including this one, the Tower of London. That alone should indicate the popularity of this fashionable micro-hotel chain, which has outposts from Amsterdam to Taipei.Photo courtesy citizenM
Slide 13 of 16: Amsterdam, The NetherlandsSlightly larger than a micro-hotel, but similar in spirit, Zuko locations in Amsterdam offer micro-suites geared toward modern business travel—plenty of table space to meet or dine, and slim sleeping arrangements with all the modern conveniences.Photo courtesy Zuko
Slide 14 of 16: Winthrop, WashingtonIf dense, urban centers aren't your thing, but you believe in the ethos of micro-accommodations, consider the Rolling Huts in the Old West town of Winthrop, which sits in Washington's magnificent Methow Valley. The setting is rural, but the modern huts are anything but (think glamping). Each one has 200 square feet of interior space, plus a slightly larger deck.Photo credit Tim Bies / Olson Kundig, courtesy Rolling Huts
Slide 15 of 16: Portland, OregonWhen the tiny house movement meets the hospitality industry, you get the ever-adorable Caravan, a collection of one-of-a-kind tiny home hotel "rooms" on what was once a used car lot in—predictably—Portland.Photo courtesy Jeffrey Freeman
Slide 16 of 16: Lyons, ColoradoThe aptly named Wee Casa bills itself as the world's largest tiny house resort, with 22 unique tiny homes situated at the gateway to the Rockies.Photo courtesy Wee Casa Tiny House Resort

In cities across the globe, chic micro-hotels solve the problem of where to lay your head at night—often for a pretty reasonable price.

Nine Hours

Narita, Japan

The first Nine Hours opened in 2009, and while it’s part of the Japanese capsule hotel phenomenon that started in the ’70s, this chic, modern version helped kickstart the modern micro-hotel trend. The people behind Nine Hours asked a simple question—what do you really need in an overnight stay in a busy urban center? A place to shower. One hour. Check. A place to sleep. Seven hours. Check. And somewhere to get dressed the next day. One hour. Check. Nine Hours has it all, in about as compact a space as you might imagine.

Pod Brooklyn

Brooklyn, New York

Pod Brooklyn isn’t the first Pod micro-hotel in New York, but it does have one of the most desirable addresses for its target millennial audience—smack dab in the middle of uber-trendy Williamsburg. Each of the 249 rooms is roughly 100 square feet, most with twin bunks or a queen. And what the hotel lacks in square footage per room it makes up for in free wi-fi, rooftop gardens, delicious food and cocktails. Additional Pod hotels are across the East River in Manhattan and down in D.C.

Photo courtesy Pod Brooklyn

Yotel Paris Charles de Gaulle

Paris, France

Like Nine Hours, and certain Moxy locations, Yotel cuts straight to the chase with its airport-based “airside” locations. The Yotel Paris Charles de Gaulle has cabins bookable by the hour in Terminal 2E.

Photo courtesy Yotel

Yotel Singapore

Singapore

The first Yotel in Asia, Yotel Singapore, is on the other side of the spectrum—a nod toward luxury, but in spare, 175-square-foot rooms right on the scene-y Orchard Road.

Photo courtesy Yotel

The Jane Hotel

New York, New York

When it comes to micro-accommodations in New York, The Jane Hotel is in a class by itself. Originally built in 1908, the cabin-like rooms were meant for sailors.

Photo courtesy The Jane Hotel

Tribe Perth

Perth, Australia

Tribe Perth is the first micro-hotel in Australia—though the concept is catching on Down Under. Each of its efficient and beautifully designed 126 rooms is fewer than 200 square feet (18 square meters).

Photo credit Earl Carter, courtesy Tribe Perth

Moxy New Orleans

New Orleans, Louisiana

The U.S. flagship outpost of Marriott’s Moxy boutique hotels, in New Orleans, is less micro, per se, but definitely all millennial. The concept is the same—smaller, pared-down rooms, with ample communal space and endlessly Instagrammable decor.

Photo courtesy Marriott International

Moxy Eschborn Frankfurt

Frankfurt, Germany

Similarly, the Moxy Eschborn Frankfurt delivers on the chain’s promise—big offerings in a small footprint. And pops of hot pink.

Photo courtesy Marriott International

Tubohotel

Tepoztlan, México

What is a Tubohotel? Exactly what it sounds like—a set of tubes, stacked in pyramid form, each with queen beds. This truly unique micro-hotel sits on an organic farm in the village of Tepoztlan, 45 minutes south of Mexico City.

Photo courtesy Tubohotel

Arlo NoMad

New York, New York

The impossibly chic Arlo NoMad maintains a warm, modern-minimalist vibe in the rooms, which are around 150 square feet, max. The big draws are the ample communal spaces—including what the U.K. Telegraph calls “probably the best Empire State selfie spot in all of Manhattan.” A sister property is just south, in Soho.

Photo courtesy Arlo NoMad

citizenM Tower of London

London, England

There are three citizenM locations across London alone, including this one, the Tower of London. That alone should indicate the popularity of this fashionable micro-hotel chain, which has outposts from Amsterdam to Taipei.

Photo courtesy citizenM

Zuko

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Slightly larger than a micro-hotel, but similar in spirit, Zuko locations in Amsterdam offer micro-suites geared toward modern business travel—plenty of table space to meet or dine, and slim sleeping arrangements with all the modern conveniences.

Photo courtesy Zuko

Rolling Huts

Winthrop, Washington

If dense, urban centers aren’t your thing, but you believe in the ethos of micro-accommodations, consider the Rolling Huts in the Old West town of Winthrop, which sits in Washington’s magnificent Methow Valley. The setting is rural, but the modern huts are anything but (think glamping). Each one has 200 square feet of interior space, plus a slightly larger deck.

Photo credit Tim Bies / Olson Kundig, courtesy Rolling Huts

Caravan

Portland, Oregon

When the tiny house movement meets the hospitality industry, you get the ever-adorable Caravan, a collection of one-of-a-kind tiny home hotel “rooms” on what was once a used car lot in—predictably—Portland.

Photo courtesy Jeffrey Freeman

Wee Casa

Lyons, Colorado

The aptly named Wee Casa bills itself as the world’s largest tiny house resort, with 22 unique tiny homes situated at the gateway to the Rockies.

Photo courtesy Wee Casa Tiny House Resort

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