20 of the World’s Strangest Hotels



Slide 1 of 21: If you think a bidet is a bizarre hotel amenity, how about a herd of giraffes? Or a jumbo jet’s dashboard? Or furniture made entirely of salt? No matter how kooky, kinky or adventurous your tastes may be, there’s probably a hotel out there that will cater to them. Weirdness is the norm at these 20 properties, where rooms are made of concrete pipes and glass bedrooms hang from cliffs.
Slide 2 of 21: You awake after a peaceful night’s sleep in one of this lodge’s six lavish bedrooms, get showered and dressed, and head downstairs to the light-filled sunroom for breakfast. You pour cream into your coffee, spread jam on your toast … and offer a slice to the endangered Rothschild’s giraffe that just poked its head through a window. That’s right: Giraffe Manor is said to be the only place in the world where you can feed giraffes over the breakfast table, from your guestroom window, or at the front door.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 3 of 21: This sprawling forest resort, more than 125 miles north of the Arctic Circle, is renowned for its stunning “Glass Igloos,” which are designed to facilitate viewings of the aurora borealis. Two-person igloos include a toilet and the option of an extra bed, with saunas and showers available in separate buildings. Four-person igloos include their own toilet and shower.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 4 of 21: A short drive from Christchurch on the Banks Peninsula, the humble grain silo has been converted into series of innovative eco-friendly accommodations with full kitchens, balconies and TVs. No pain, no grain.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 5 of 21: If you’ve got five giant pieces of concrete drainage pipe just lying around, you might as well turn them into hotel rooms, right? The “sleep pipes” in question feature double beds, plush bedding, a cute little lamp and a nifty storage space for luggage. Toilets, showers and a café are located in the surrounding public park, the site of a former water purification plant.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 6 of 21: What works for concrete pipes goes double for a disused timber crane in this Dutch port town. Unlike the sleep pipes, however, this crane is luxuriously outfitted for two guests with a touch-screen entertainment and lighting system, designer furniture and an oversized shower/bath. The rooftop patio offers stunning panoramas of the Wadden Sea, which will change when guests grab the crane’s controls and slowly swing it around 360 degrees.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 7 of 21: Aptly set on the stunning salt flats of Uyuni, the self-proclaimed “first salt hotel in the world” features a soaring lobby, stylish bar and 16 comfy rooms with private bathrooms, all of which were constructed out of salt. Much of the furniture, too, is made from sodium chloride.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 8 of 21: Who knew sleeping on an airplane could be this comfortable? Of course, the Boeing 747-212B in question never leaves the tarmac of Stockholm Arlanda Airport, and is split into 25 rooms for up to three adults, a four-bed dorm, and a “luxury suite” in the converted cockpit offering panoramic views of the runways. There’s even an onboard café and a left-wing observation deck in case you’ve ever wanted to stand on a jumbo jet’s wing.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 9 of 21: The underwater bedroom of this three-story Swedish-engineered floating suite allows guests to watching shoals of reef fish swim by. The top deck is ideal for sunbathing, while lounging and dining is recommended at sea level.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 10 of 21: Tree house hotels have become passé (on this list at least) but there’s no ignoring this Canadian entry. Suspended like pendants from webs of rope, these handcrafted spheres dangle amid the lush rainforest canopy of Vancouver Island. They may look like oversized seeds or giant eggs, but the spheres (named Eve, Eryn and Melody) are furnished with closets, double beds and sofas, and come equipped with sinks, microwaves and refrigerators. Guests climb into their spheres via spiral staircases leading to short suspension bridges, a path they must then retrace to reach the composting toilet outhouse located at the base of the spheres.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 11 of 21: This two-story dog-shaped B and B named “Sweet Willy” sleeps four guests, who must enter via the, er, anatomical exit. Once inside, you’ll find a queen-size bed in Willy’s stomach, a loft in his head, and a reading nook in his nose.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 12 of 21: If Little Red Riding Hood is reading this she might want to look away. Said to offer the only accommodations of its kind in North America, the new Wolf Cabin features panoramic bay windows that offer unobstructed views of the canines housed in the wildlife park’s grey wolf observatory. There’s also a full kitchen (you know, in case you need to prepare a picnic basket for grandma) and an outdoor terrace outside the wolf enclosure.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 13 of 21: Fans of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial may be reminded of the movie’s final scene when they visit these seven surreal “treerooms” in the pine forest around the village of Harads. The UFO room is undeniably otherworldly, as is the aptly-named Bird’s Nest, the shimmering Mirrorcube, and the capsule-like Cabin.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 14 of 21: If you’re too tall for the Woodlyn motel park’s two Lord of the Rings-themed Hobbit units, each of which includes an ensuite bathroom and full kitchen, there are always the five suites in the Waitanic Ship, the Bristol Freightor Plane’s two units, and more lodgings in the Waitanic Express Train. Curiouser and curiouser!
Slide 15 of 21: Before it found a home in this esoteric jungle resort, the “727 Fuselage Home” carried passengers for South Africa Air and Colombia’s Avianca Airlines. Now, the refurbished Boeing 727 serves as a two-bedroom suite that juts out from the forest canopy.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 16 of 21: Set on the whimsical grounds of the Jester House, these fairytale-themed digs contain a spiral staircase, queen-size bed, and a Juliet balcony framed by a hazelnut grove. The maximum occupancy is two, so if you have so many children you don’t know what to do, well, you’re probably out of luck.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 17 of 21: The self-proclaimed “world’s only underwater hotel,” set more than 25 feet below the surface of the Emerald Lagoon, offers hot showers, a kitchen, and an Amazon Fire Stick for music and movies on demand. Guests can watch fish swim past the lodge’s windows, or join them in the tropical waters by taking a Discover SCUBA Diving course.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 18 of 21: Designed by Dutch artist Joep van Lieshout, this giant polyester replica of the human digestive system is equipped with a double bed, table, shower and toilet. Breakfast is included in the room rate, but you still have to digest it yourself.
Slide 19 of 21: According to the Natura Vive alpine resort, the next best thing to sleeping in a condor’s nest is sleeping in one of its three transparent capsules that hang from a mountainside. Made out of aerospace-grade aluminum and weather-resistant polycarbonate, each suite comes with four beds, a dining area and, somehow, a private bathroom. Getting there, meanwhile, requires guests to scale a via ferrata course or brave a series of zip lines.
See photo on Facebook
Slide 20 of 21: If you’re brave and skilled enough to scale Mont Blanc, reaching an altitude of 9,300 feet, you can claim one of the 12 beds in this tube-shaped alpine refuge. Other amenities include an electric stove and computer with Internet connection.
Slide 21 of 21: Designed to allow guests to admire the Northern Lights and midnight sun from their beds, this nature-oriented hotel is home to 13 stylishly unusual suites. Each features a kitchenette, fireplace, and this being Finland, a sauna.
See photo on Facebook

20 of the World’s Strangest Hotels

If you think a bidet is a bizarre hotel amenity, how about a herd of giraffes? Or a jumbo jet’s dashboard? Or furniture made entirely of salt? No matter how kooky, kinky or adventurous your tastes may be, there’s probably a hotel out there that will cater to them. Weirdness is the norm at these 20 properties, where rooms are made of concrete pipes and glass bedrooms hang from cliffs.

Giraffe Manor, Nairobi, Kenya

You awake after a peaceful night’s sleep in one of this lodge’s six lavish bedrooms, get showered and dressed, and head downstairs to the light-filled sunroom for breakfast. You pour cream into your coffee, spread jam on your toast … and offer a slice to the endangered Rothschild’s giraffe that just poked its head through a window. That’s right: Giraffe Manor is said to be the only place in the world where you can feed giraffes over the breakfast table, from your guestroom window, or at the front door.

See photo on Facebook

Kakslauttanen Hotel, Saariselkä, Finland

This sprawling forest resort, more than 125 miles north of the Arctic Circle, is renowned for its stunning “Glass Igloos,” which are designed to facilitate viewings of the aurora borealis. Two-person igloos include a toilet and the option of an extra bed, with saunas and showers available in separate buildings. Four-person igloos include their own toilet and shower.

See photo on Facebook

SiloStay, Little River, New Zealand

A short drive from Christchurch on the Banks Peninsula, the humble grain silo has been converted into series of innovative eco-friendly accommodations with full kitchens, balconies and TVs. No pain, no grain.

See photo on Facebook

Dasparkhotel, Ottensheim, Austria

If you’ve got five giant pieces of concrete drainage pipe just lying around, you might as well turn them into hotel rooms, right? The “sleep pipes” in question feature double beds, plush bedding, a cute little lamp and a nifty storage space for luggage. Toilets, showers and a café are located in the surrounding public park, the site of a former water purification plant.

See photo on Facebook

Harbour Crane, Harlingen, Netherlands

What works for concrete pipes goes double for a disused timber crane in this Dutch port town. Unlike the sleep pipes, however, this crane is luxuriously outfitted for two guests with a touch-screen entertainment and lighting system, designer furniture and an oversized shower/bath. The rooftop patio offers stunning panoramas of the Wadden Sea, which will change when guests grab the crane’s controls and slowly swing it around 360 degrees.

See photo on Facebook

Palacio de Sal, Uyuni, Bolivia

Aptly set on the stunning salt flats of Uyuni, the self-proclaimed “first salt hotel in the world” features a soaring lobby, stylish bar and 16 comfy rooms with private bathrooms, all of which were constructed out of salt. Much of the furniture, too, is made from sodium chloride.

See photo on Facebook

Jumbo Stay, Stockholm, Sweden

Who knew sleeping on an airplane could be this comfortable? Of course, the Boeing 747-212B in question never leaves the tarmac of Stockholm Arlanda Airport, and is split into 25 rooms for up to three adults, a four-bed dorm, and a “luxury suite” in the converted cockpit offering panoramic views of the runways. There’s even an onboard café and a left-wing observation deck in case you’ve ever wanted to stand on a jumbo jet’s wing.

See photo on Facebook

The Manta Resort, Pemba Island, Tanzania

The underwater bedroom of this three-story Swedish-engineered floating suite allows guests to watching shoals of reef fish swim by. The top deck is ideal for sunbathing, while lounging and dining is recommended at sea level.

See photo on Facebook

Free Spirit Spheres, Qualicum Bay, British Columbia

Tree house hotels have become passé (on this list at least) but there’s no ignoring this Canadian entry. Suspended like pendants from webs of rope, these handcrafted spheres dangle amid the lush rainforest canopy of Vancouver Island. They may look like oversized seeds or giant eggs, but the spheres (named Eve, Eryn and Melody) are furnished with closets, double beds and sofas, and come equipped with sinks, microwaves and refrigerators. Guests climb into their spheres via spiral staircases leading to short suspension bridges, a path they must then retrace to reach the composting toilet outhouse located at the base of the spheres.

See photo on Facebook

Dog Bark Park Inn, Cottonwood, Idaho

This two-story dog-shaped B and B named “Sweet Willy” sleeps four guests, who must enter via the, er, anatomical exit. Once inside, you’ll find a queen-size bed in Willy’s stomach, a loft in his head, and a reading nook in his nose.

See photo on Facebook

Wolf Cabin, Parc Omega, Quebec

If Little Red Riding Hood is reading this she might want to look away. Said to offer the only accommodations of its kind in North America, the new Wolf Cabin features panoramic bay windows that offer unobstructed views of the canines housed in the wildlife park’s grey wolf observatory. There’s also a full kitchen (you know, in case you need to prepare a picnic basket for grandma) and an outdoor terrace outside the wolf enclosure.

See photo on Facebook

Treehotel, Harads, Sweden

Fans of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial may be reminded of the movie’s final scene when they visit these seven surreal “treerooms” in the pine forest around the village of Harads. The UFO room is undeniably otherworldly, as is the aptly-named Bird’s Nest, the shimmering Mirrorcube, and the capsule-like Cabin.

See photo on Facebook

The Hobbit Motel, Woodlyn Park, Waitomo, New Zealand

If you’re too tall for the Woodlyn motel park’s two Lord of the Rings-themed Hobbit units, each of which includes an ensuite bathroom and full kitchen, there are always the five suites in the Waitanic Ship, the Bristol Freightor Plane’s two units, and more lodgings in the Waitanic Express Train. Curiouser and curiouser!

Costa Verde, Manuel Antonio National Park, Costa Rica

Before it found a home in this esoteric jungle resort, the “727 Fuselage Home” carried passengers for South Africa Air and Colombia’s Avianca Airlines. Now, the refurbished Boeing 727 serves as a two-bedroom suite that juts out from the forest canopy.

See photo on Facebook

The Boot B and B, Tasman, New Zealand

Set on the whimsical grounds of the Jester House, these fairytale-themed digs contain a spiral staircase, queen-size bed, and a Juliet balcony framed by a hazelnut grove. The maximum occupancy is two, so if you have so many children you don’t know what to do, well, you’re probably out of luck.

See photo on Facebook

Jules’ Undersea Lodge, Key Largo Undersea Park, Florida

The self-proclaimed “world’s only underwater hotel,” set more than 25 feet below the surface of the Emerald Lagoon, offers hot showers, a kitchen, and an Amazon Fire Stick for music and movies on demand. Guests can watch fish swim past the lodge’s windows, or join them in the tropical waters by taking a Discover SCUBA Diving course.

See photo on Facebook

Hotel CasAnus, Antwerp, Belgium

Designed by Dutch artist Joep van Lieshout, this giant polyester replica of the human digestive system is equipped with a double bed, table, shower and toilet. Breakfast is included in the room rate, but you still have to digest it yourself.

Skylodge Adventure Suites, Sacred Valley, Peru

According to the Natura Vive alpine resort, the next best thing to sleeping in a condor’s nest is sleeping in one of its three transparent capsules that hang from a mountainside. Made out of aerospace-grade aluminum and weather-resistant polycarbonate, each suite comes with four beds, a dining area and, somehow, a private bathroom. Getting there, meanwhile, requires guests to scale a via ferrata course or brave a series of zip lines.

See photo on Facebook

Bivacco Gervasutti, Mont Blanc, Italy

If you’re brave and skilled enough to scale Mont Blanc, reaching an altitude of 9,300 feet, you can claim one of the 12 beds in this tube-shaped alpine refuge. Other amenities include an electric stove and computer with Internet connection.

Arctic TreeHouse Hotel, Rovaniemi, Finland

Designed to allow guests to admire the Northern Lights and midnight sun from their beds, this nature-oriented hotel is home to 13 stylishly unusual suites. Each features a kitchenette, fireplace, and this being Finland, a sauna.

See photo on Facebook

Source: Read Full Article