Stunning drone footage of Europe’s largest glacier

Breathtaking drone footage shows the stunning landscape of Europe’s largest glacier, which covers nine per cent of Iceland

  • Stefano Tiozzo filmed a series of unique aerial images of the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland earlier this year 
  • It is the largest ice cap in Europe by volume and at its deepest point it is 1,000 metres (3,280ft) thick 
  • Lurking underneath are a number of huge active volcanoes, including Bárðarbunga and Grímsvötn

A drone has captured breathtaking footage of Europe’s largest glacier.

Italian photographer Stefano Tiozzo, 33, filmed a series of unique aerial images of the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland throughout February 2019.

It is the largest ice cap in Europe by volume and at its deepest point it is 1,000 metres (3,280ft) thick.

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    Incredible drone footage captured by Italian photographer Stefano Tiozzo shows Europe's largest glacier, Vatnajokull in Iceland

    Incredible drone footage captured by Italian photographer Stefano Tiozzo shows Europe’s largest glacier, Vatnajokull in Iceland 

    Vatnajokull is the largest ice cap in Europe by volume and at its deepest point it is 1,000 metres (3,280ft) thick

    Vatnajokull is the largest ice cap in Europe by volume and at its deepest point it is 1,000 metres (3,280ft) thick

    The glacier displays several 'tongues' - parts where the ice stretches from the core into the Icelandic tundra

    The glacier displays several ‘tongues’ – parts where the ice stretches from the core into the Icelandic tundra

    Stefano filmed his series of unique aerial images of the Vatnajökull glacier throughout February 2019

    Stefano filmed his series of unique aerial images of the Vatnajökull glacier throughout February 2019

    Stefano, who lives in Moscow, said: 'Seeing the glacier from above gives you an idea of its sheer size'

    Stefano, who lives in Moscow, said: ‘Seeing the glacier from above gives you an idea of its sheer size’ 

    The glacier displays several ‘tongues’ – parts where the ice stretches from the core into the Icelandic tundra.

    Stefano, who lives in Moscow, Russia, said: ‘Seeing the glacier from above gives you an idea of its sheer size.

    ‘This was the second year in a row that I visited Vatnajökull, which is receding fast due to rising temperatures.

    It is believed that the ice that makes up the ice caves is around 1,000 years old and has been compressed so much it is as hard as steel

    It is believed that the ice that makes up the ice caves is around 1,000 years old and has been compressed so much it is as hard as steel

    A mesmerising shot captured inside the glacier. Lurking underneath are a number of huge active volcanoes, including Öræfajökull, Bárðarbunga and Grímsvötn. The latter is extremely lively and erupted as recently as May 2011, producing an ash cloud that rose 12 miles into the air

    A mesmerising shot captured inside the glacier. Lurking underneath are a number of huge active volcanoes, including Öræfajökull, Bárðarbunga and Grímsvötn. The latter is extremely lively and erupted as recently as May 2011, producing an ash cloud that rose 12 miles into the air

    Stefano added: 'This was the second year in a row that I visited Vatnajökull, which is receding fast due to rising temperatures'

    Stefano added: ‘This was the second year in a row that I visited Vatnajökull, which is receding fast due to rising temperatures’ 

    ‘This year, I visited some of the same spots and it was very clear that the ice had receded, leaving big gaps behind.’

    The Vatnajökull glacier is the central feature of the Vatnajökull National Park.

    According to www.glacierguides.is Vatnajökull covers an area measuring 8,000 square kilometres (5,500 square miles) – that’s nine per cent of Iceland – and has a total ice volume of 3,300 cubic kilometres (791 cubic miles).

    It is believed that the ice that makes up the ice caves is around 1,000 years old and has been compressed so much it is as hard as steel. 

    The Vatnajökull glacier covers nine per cent of Iceland and is the central feature of the Vatnajökull National Park

    The Vatnajökull glacier covers nine per cent of Iceland and is the central feature of the Vatnajökull National Park

    Vatnajökull is home to Iceland¿s highest mountain, 6,922ft-high Hvannadalshnúkur
    It is estimated to have a volume of 3,300 cubic km (791 cubic miles)

    In the freeze frame: Vatnajökull covers an area measuring 8,000 square kilometres (5,500 square miles) and has a total ice volume of 3,300 cubic kilometres (791 cubic miles)

    The glacier was used as a filming location for the opening scenes of the James Bond movie A View To A Kill

    The glacier was used as a filming location for the opening scenes of the James Bond movie A View To A Kill 

    Lurking underneath, meanwhile, are a number of huge active volcanoes, including Öræfajökull, Bárðarbunga and Grímsvötn. The latter is extremely lively and erupted as recently as May 2011, producing an ash cloud that rose 12 miles into the air.

    Vatnajökull is also home to Iceland’s highest mountain, 6,922ft-high Hvannadalshnúkur.

    Such is the sheer majesty of the landscape that the producers of James Bond movie A View To A Kill were moved to use it as the location for the opening scenes.  

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