These Are the Most Epic Hiking Trails in Every State

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A polar bear navigates the Arctic climes of Greenland. After the International Union for Conservation of Nature classified polar bears as a vulnerable species, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, and the U.S. created the Circumpolar Action Plan, a 10-year global conservation strategy to secure the long-term survival of polar bears.
Slide 1 of 51: Hiking is one of the best ways to escape your ordinary surroundings, get some exercise, and explore the nature that's right in your backyard-or at the very least, in your state. In fact, an April 2019 study from the International Journal of Biometeorology suggests that forest bathing, aka being out in nature, can significantly lower stress levels. Whether you're a newbie hiker or an veteran trekster, these jaw-dropping trails across the country will inspire you to lace up your hiking shoes and get outdoors. Here are the most breathtaking trails in every state.
Slide 2 of 51: Set in the heart of Green Mountain Nature Preserve, this 2.2-mile trail leads to a rushing tiered waterfall. It's accessible for hikers of all levels, including four-legged furry friends (as long as they're on a leash).
Slide 3 of 51: This 1.8-mile out-and-back trail in Kenai Fjords National Park offers all of the dramatic excitement of the state without the dangerous terrain. In just 15- to 20-minutes you'll make it from the parking to the Exit Glacier-and you'll even be able to hear it crackle.
Slide 4 of 51: Jutting up from the earth among Sedona's famous red rock formations, the hike up to Cathedral Rock is only one mile-but with its steep ascent, be prepared for a workout. Psst ... Like several other destinations in Sedona, Cathedral Rock is known for having a vortex, or spiritual energy center. So if you find yourself feeling extra inspired or calm, that might be why.
Slide 5 of 51: Near the town of Deer, Arkansas is this 2.9-mile trail, which features a waterfall-but that's not the most awe-inspiring part of the hike. The path culminates at Hawksbill Crag, a rock formation that overlooks a vast valley below Whitaker Creek.
Slide 6 of 51: Redwood National Park features this easy 3.5-mile loop that's magnificently close to Hyperion, the world's tallest tree (it's not marked, so you'll have to look for it). Heads up that you'll need a permit from a visitors center before embarking on your adventure.
Slide 7 of 51: Just outside of Aspen, the 1.9-mile trail around Maroon Lake offers lucky visitors a look at Maroon Bells' dazzling reflection on the glassy water below. (Remember to bring water and take it slow-the elevation here is about 9,580 feet.)
Slide 8 of 51: On a peninsula jutting out into the Long Island Sound, this 3.6-mile shoreline trail is known for the beautiful wildflowers you'll spot along the way. You'll also spot visitors fishing, swimming, and biking in the area.
Slide 9 of 51: Believe it or not, Delaware has sand dunes, and they're beautifully reminiscent of the desert. Partway through, the 2.6-mile trail leads hikers through The Great Dune, which is 80 feet above the ocean (it's the state's highest dune).
Slide 10 of 51: In the midst of Florida's largest national park, is a boardwalk hike that is unlike any other. In the swamp below, visitors can spot alligators, birds, snakes, and more.
Slide 11 of 51: This moderate 2.2-mile trail is in Black Rock Mountain State Park and goes through some of Georgia's highest elevation points. During the hike, look north for views of the Appalachian Mountains.
Slide 12 of 51: Starting in the lush rainforest, this hike is a favorite on the Big Island in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Descend from the crater's rim and explore the path's volcanic features, such as steam vents and spatter cones.
Slide 13 of 51: This quickie loop around the Plummer Creek Marsh area of Coeur d’Alene Lake is said to be one of the best places in the state to catch a glimpse of wildlife. In just 1.6 miles, watch for unique birds and even moose.
Slide 14 of 51: In the midst of Shawnee National Forest, this hike is challenging, but worth it for the beautiful views of  the Big Muddy River and the Mississippi floodplain at the top (not to mention the flowing creek and wildflowers along the way). Shawnee National Forest also features sandstone caves to explore.
Slide 15 of 51: In the state's aptly named Hoosier National Forest, the majority of the 1.2-mile loop is spent in a canyon surrounded by soothing hemlock and oak forests. Toward the end, hikers can spot a waterfall, too, making this hike both scenic and peaceful.
Slide 16 of 51: As the name suggests, this state park offers plenty of caves to explore along the 1.7-mile trail, so wear clothes that you don't mind getting dirty. There's a river rushing through the area, too.
Slide 17 of 51: This moderate 2.8-mile lake loop is the perfect choice for casual adventure seekers. With several rocky stretches and creek crossings, it's people- and dog-friendly.
Slide 18 of 51: Want incredible rewards in a short amount of time? In just 1.8 miles, visitors can marvel at the famous Cumberland Falls within Cumberland Falls State Park, also known as "little Niagara." Don't forget your bathing suit during warmer months-the swimming hole is the perfect place to cool off.
Slide 19 of 51: Near Cloutierville, Louisiana is this trail, which offers a unique variety of settings. In 1.4 miles, hikers will come across meadows, creeks, forests, and even a waterfall.
Slide 20 of 51: Just outside of the town of Bar Harbor on Mount Desert Island, Acadia National Park offers visitors a look at a unique landmark in just a .7-mile hike (one way). Perched on the side of South Bubble Mountain, a boulder called Bubble Rock sits precariously above the beautiful Maine wilderness-it can be seen toward the summit of the hike, just a short side trail away.
Slide 21 of 51: This  5.9-mile loop in Sugarloaf Mountain Natural Area is particularly stunning when the fall foliage is in full swing. Pro tip: It's a busy trail, so get there early if you're looking for a more peaceful journey.
Slide 22 of 51: The treeless summit of this 3.5-mile trail often has neat rock cairns to marvel at. Plus, from the top of the second peak, hikers can catch a glimpse of the Boston skyline on a clear day.
Slide 23 of 51: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore features a variety of trails to choose from, but Chapel Trail is the favorite in the area. The best part? Hikers are treated to views of amazing waterfalls rushing into Lake Superior.
Slide 24 of 51: Gooseberry Falls is the crown jewel of this hike near Two Harbors, Minnesota-but this trail actually passes by a handful of waterfalls. Hikers will also get to see Lake Superior.
Slide 25 of 51: In the Appalachian foothills, this trail in Tishomingo State Park is known for its unique rock formations along the path. It's also filled with lush green hues, from moss to ferns.
Slide 26 of 51: This is one of several trails in a network behind the Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center, and with its winding paths and picturesque tree-filled setting, it's arguably the most scenic. The area also features a lake and is a go-to spot for birdwatching.
Slide 27 of 51: Set within Montana's Glacier National Park, every step of this 9.7-mile challenging hike will take your breath away-in a good way. Hikers will earn incredible views of Grinnell Lake and Lake Josephine, and as the hike's name points out, Grinnell Glacier. (Be wary of bear activity in the area, though.)
Slide 28 of 51: This trail begins at the visitor center of Scotts Bluff National Monument, 800 feet above the North Platte River. On the 1.6-mile trail up to the summit, hikers will pass through a tunnel leading to incredible views of the historic region.
Slide 29 of 51: From the area's signature wildflowers to its awe-inspiring red rocks, this hike in Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area brings in visitors from all over, thanks to its vibrant colors. Its desert setting also makes it a perfect winter adventure (because it's too toasty in the height of summer).
Slide 30 of 51: This 3.2-mile trail showcases some of the best scenery in Crawford Notch State Park in the White Mountains, including a waterfall. It's also a great trek for owners of, well, good boys-dogs are allowed off-leash.
Slide 31 of 51: They don't call New Jersey the Garden State for nothing. This lush hike features stretches of forest, boardwalks, and even a suspension bridge before ascending the steep switchbacks known as the "Stairway to Heaven." It leads up to Pinwheel Vista, offering panoramic views of the region below.
Slide 32 of 51: In Santa Fe National Forest, this trail is a great choice for visitors who are staying in the city itself (the trailhead is on the East side of town). The finale of the out-and-back trail is spectacular views of the landscape below.
Slide 33 of 51: This 3.3-mile trail offers hikers the opportunity to explore the area's signature ice caves, and the pinnacle of the hike is this scenic overlook called Sam's Point. More advanced hikers can opt for the 8.3-mile Sam's Point and Verkeerderkill Falls Trail, which leads to the same location.
Slide 34 of 51: As the highest point in the region, Clingmans Dome offers exceptional panoramic views of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Visitors can take it all in on this paved 1.2-mile path, or for more of a challenge, similar views can be found on Andrews Bald Trail.
Slide 35 of 51: In Theodore Roosevelt National Park, this simple 1.1-mile loop offers views of the colorful Painted Canyon. For wildlife seekers, bison can also often be seen from the trail.
Slide 36 of 51: This 1.6-mile hike in Cuyahoga National Park features not one, but two rushing waterfalls. If you're feeling ambitious, it's also a popular path for runners.
Slide 37 of 51: This out-and-back trail is just under 3 miles of paved road to the top, so it's a good choice if you're looking for easier terrain (although it's still relatively steep). The top features views of the landscape, and it's a great place to stop and hang out for a picnic with fellow hikers.
Slide 38 of 51: Surprisingly, the best hike in Oregon is not, in fact, the Oregon Trail (as the classic video game might lead people to believe). This breathtaking 2-mile trail in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area is even better, thanks to its views of Multnomah Falls and the Benson Bridge.
Slide 39 of 51: This popular 1.9-mile trail requires a $15 entrance fee, but it's well worth it for its views of the namesake Bushkill Falls. (AllTrails reviewers suggest getting there early to avoid crowds, and be prepared for some cardio.)
Slide 40 of 51: This paved trail takes Newport visitors on a 6.7 mile seaside journey. Set along the coastline, hikers will be able to check out some of the town's most spectacular mansions from the back during their trek.
Slide 41 of 51: Carrick Creek Falls is the prime feature of this 1.9-mile hike in Table Rock State Park. Along the way, hikers will come across creek crossings with and without bridges.
Slide 42 of 51: This trail features the incredible rock formations known as Cathedral Spires in Custer State Park. In the heart of Black Hills National Forest, the 1.6-mile trail is also in a favorite spot for rock climbing (naturally).
Slide 43 of 51: On this 8.6-mile trail, hikers will get a glimpse of plenty of wildflowers-and Charlies Bunyon itself. This mountain's odd moniker comes from the boulder-like formation that protrudes just below the summit.
Slide 44 of 51: About four miles long, this out-and-back trail is a dream destination for dog owners. At the end, you'll find a swimming hole for the both of you, so bring your swimsuit (and water shoes to protect your feet from rocks).
Slide 45 of 51: Zion National Park is known as one of the most spectacular destinations in the country, and this 1-mile out-and-back trail offers visitors an incredible taste of the region (without overly challenging terrain). There are handrails in many steep places along the trail but fair warning: Considering its incredible vantage of Zion Canyon from above, it's not for those with a fear of heights.
Slide 46 of 51: In Vermont's Green Mountain National Forest, visitors to this 4.8-mile trail can enjoy more than hiking. It's also a favorite spot for fishing and camping and has all the makings of a perfect outdoor weekend adventure.
Slide 47 of 51: If you want a challenge and some alone time, this 9.5-mile trail in Shenandoah National Park is usually only moderately trafficked-probably because it's rated as difficult. But this waterfall will more than make up for the extra effort.
Slide 48 of 51: Set on the Olympic peninsula, this 9.4-mile loop explores both Washington's famously verdant forest and its rocky coastline. A little over three miles in, you'll hit the beach of Cape Alava, which just so happens to be the westernmost point in the continental United States. (As you can see, it's the perfect spot to set up camp for a while with a portable hammock.)
Slide 49 of 51: This 6.6-mile loop is located in what was named after The Battle of Loudoun Heights during the Civil War. It overlooks the historic town of Harpers Ferry, with its 19th-century buildings and architecturally interesting bridges.
Slide 50 of 51: Set in Devil's State Park, this trail is aptly named: The 4.8-mile hike is devilishly steep. But it's worth the sweat when you get to the top, thanks to incredible views of various unique rock formations and Devil's Lake below.
Slide 51 of 51: Head counterclockwise around Jenny Lake, and you'll be treated to beautiful vistas of the surrounding Grand Tetons National Park. Along the 7.4-mile loop, you'll spot waterfalls and wildlife, but beware-that may include grizzly bears, so make noise as you hike to avoid startling them.

Hiking is one of the best ways to escape your ordinary surroundings, get some exercise, and explore the nature that’s right in your backyard-or at the very least, in your state. In fact, an April 2019 study from the International Journal of Biometeorology suggests that forest bathing, aka being out in nature, can significantly lower stress levels. Whether you’re a newbie hiker or an veteran trekster, these jaw-dropping trails across the country will inspire you to lace up your hiking shoes and get outdoors. Here are the most breathtaking trails in every state.

Alabama: Alum Hollow Trail

Set in the heart of Green Mountain Nature Preserve, this 2.2-mile trail leads to a rushing tiered waterfall. It’s accessible for hikers of all levels, including four-legged furry friends (as long as they’re on a leash).

Alaska: Exit Glacier Trail

This 1.8-mile out-and-back trail in Kenai Fjords National Park offers all of the dramatic excitement of the state without the dangerous terrain. In just 15- to 20-minutes you’ll make it from the parking to the Exit Glacier-and you’ll even be able to hear it crackle.

Arizona: Cathedral Rock Trail

Jutting up from the earth among Sedona’s famous red rock formations, the hike up to Cathedral Rock is only one mile-but with its steep ascent, be prepared for a workout. Psst … Like several other destinations in Sedona, Cathedral Rock is known for having a vortex, or spiritual energy center. So if you find yourself feeling extra inspired or calm, that might be why.

Arkansas: Whitaker Point Trail

Near the town of Deer, Arkansas is this 2.9-mile trail, which features a waterfall-but that’s not the most awe-inspiring part of the hike. The path culminates at Hawksbill Crag, a rock formation that overlooks a vast valley below Whitaker Creek.

California: Tall Trees Grove Loop Trail

Redwood National Park features this easy 3.5-mile loop that’s magnificently close to Hyperion, the world’s tallest tree (it’s not marked, so you’ll have to look for it). Heads up that you’ll need a permit from a visitors center before embarking on your adventure.

Colorado: Maroon Bells Scenic Loop Trail

Just outside of Aspen, the 1.9-mile trail around Maroon Lake offers lucky visitors a look at Maroon Bells’ dazzling reflection on the glassy water below. (Remember to bring water and take it slow-the elevation here is about 9,580 feet.)

Connecticut: Bluff Point State Park and Coastal Reserve Trail

On a peninsula jutting out into the Long Island Sound, this 3.6-mile shoreline trail is known for the beautiful wildflowers you’ll spot along the way. You’ll also spot visitors fishing, swimming, and biking in the area.

Delaware: Walking Dunes Trail

Believe it or not, Delaware has sand dunes, and they’re beautifully reminiscent of the desert. Partway through, the 2.6-mile trail leads hikers through The Great Dune, which is 80 feet above the ocean (it’s the state’s highest dune).

Florida: Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park Boardwalk

In the midst of Florida’s largest national park, is a boardwalk hike that is unlike any other. In the swamp below, visitors can spot alligators, birds, snakes, and more.

Georgia: Tennessee Rock Trail

This moderate 2.2-mile trail is in Black Rock Mountain State Park and goes through some of Georgia’s highest elevation points. During the hike, look north for views of the Appalachian Mountains.

Hawaii: Klauea Iki Trail

Starting in the lush rainforest, this hike is a favorite on the Big Island in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Descend from the crater’s rim and explore the path’s volcanic features, such as steam vents and spatter cones.

Idaho: Lakeshore Loop Trail

This quickie loop around the Plummer Creek Marsh area of Coeur d’Alene Lake is said to be one of the best places in the state to catch a glimpse of wildlife. In just 1.6 miles, watch for unique birds and even moose.

Illinois: Little Grand Canyon Trail

In the midst of Shawnee National Forest, this hike is challenging, but worth it for the beautiful views of the Big Muddy River and the Mississippi floodplain at the top (not to mention the flowing creek and wildflowers along the way). Shawnee National Forest also features sandstone caves to explore.

Indiana: Hemlock Cliffs National Scenic Trail

In the state’s aptly named Hoosier National Forest, the majority of the 1.2-mile loop is spent in a canyon surrounded by soothing hemlock and oak forests. Toward the end, hikers can spot a waterfall, too, making this hike both scenic and peaceful.

Iowa: Maquoketa Caves State Park

As the name suggests, this state park offers plenty of caves to explore along the 1.7-mile trail, so wear clothes that you don’t mind getting dirty. There’s a river rushing through the area, too.

Kansas: Clinton Lake North Shore Loop

This moderate 2.8-mile lake loop is the perfect choice for casual adventure seekers. With several rocky stretches and creek crossings, it’s people- and dog-friendly.

Kentucky: Eagle Falls Trail

Want incredible rewards in a short amount of time? In just 1.8 miles, visitors can marvel at the famous Cumberland Falls within Cumberland Falls State Park, also known as “little Niagara.” Don’t forget your bathing suit during warmer months-the swimming hole is the perfect place to cool off.

Louisiana: Longleaf Vista Interpretive Trail

Near Cloutierville, Louisiana is this trail, which offers a unique variety of settings. In 1.4 miles, hikers will come across meadows, creeks, forests, and even a waterfall.

Maine: Bubble Rock Trail

Just outside of the town of Bar Harbor on Mount Desert Island, Acadia National Park offers visitors a look at a unique landmark in just a .7-mile hike (one way). Perched on the side of South Bubble Mountain, a boulder called Bubble Rock sits precariously above the beautiful Maine wilderness-it can be seen toward the summit of the hike, just a short side trail away.

Maryland: Sugarloaf Mountain and Northern Peaks Trail

This 5.9-mile loop in Sugarloaf Mountain Natural Area is particularly stunning when the fall foliage is in full swing. Pro tip: It’s a busy trail, so get there early if you’re looking for a more peaceful journey.

Massachusetts: Mount Watatic and Nutting Hill via Wapack Trail

The treeless summit of this 3.5-mile trail often has neat rock cairns to marvel at. Plus, from the top of the second peak, hikers can catch a glimpse of the Boston skyline on a clear day.

Michigan: Chapel Trail Mosquito Falls

Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore features a variety of trails to choose from, but Chapel Trail is the favorite in the area. The best part? Hikers are treated to views of amazing waterfalls rushing into Lake Superior.

Minnesota: Fifth Falls and Superior Hiking Trail Loop

Gooseberry Falls is the crown jewel of this hike near Two Harbors, Minnesota-but this trail actually passes by a handful of waterfalls. Hikers will also get to see Lake Superior.

Mississippi: Bear Creek Outcropping Trail

In the Appalachian foothills, this trail in Tishomingo State Park is known for its unique rock formations along the path. It’s also filled with lush green hues, from moss to ferns.

Missouri: Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center Outer Trail Loop

This is one of several trails in a network behind the Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center, and with its winding paths and picturesque tree-filled setting, it’s arguably the most scenic. The area also features a lake and is a go-to spot for birdwatching.

Montana: Grinnell Glacier Trail

Set within Montana’s Glacier National Park, every step of this 9.7-mile challenging hike will take your breath away-in a good way. Hikers will earn incredible views of Grinnell Lake and Lake Josephine, and as the hike’s name points out, Grinnell Glacier. (Be wary of bear activity in the area, though.)

Nebraska: Saddle Rock Trail

This trail begins at the visitor center of Scotts Bluff National Monument, 800 feet above the North Platte River. On the 1.6-mile trail up to the summit, hikers will pass through a tunnel leading to incredible views of the historic region.

Nevada: Calico Tanks Trail

From the area’s signature wildflowers to its awe-inspiring red rocks, this hike in Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area brings in visitors from all over, thanks to its vibrant colors. Its desert setting also makes it a perfect winter adventure (because it’s too toasty in the height of summer).

New Hampshire: Mount Willard Trail

This 3.2-mile trail showcases some of the best scenery in Crawford Notch State Park in the White Mountains, including a waterfall. It’s also a great trek for owners of, well, good boys-dogs are allowed off-leash.

New Jersey: Stairway to Heaven and Pochuck Valley via Appalachian Trail

They don’t call New Jersey the Garden State for nothing. This lush hike features stretches of forest, boardwalks, and even a suspension bridge before ascending the steep switchbacks known as the “Stairway to Heaven.” It leads up to Pinwheel Vista, offering panoramic views of the region below.

New Mexico: Atalaya Mountain Trail

In Santa Fe National Forest, this trail is a great choice for visitors who are staying in the city itself (the trailhead is on the East side of town). The finale of the out-and-back trail is spectacular views of the landscape below.

New York: Ice Cave White Loop Trail

This 3.3-mile trail offers hikers the opportunity to explore the area’s signature ice caves, and the pinnacle of the hike is this scenic overlook called Sam’s Point. More advanced hikers can opt for the 8.3-mile Sam’s Point and Verkeerderkill Falls Trail, which leads to the same location.

North Carolina: Clingmans Dome Observation Tower Trail

As the highest point in the region, Clingmans Dome offers exceptional panoramic views of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Visitors can take it all in on this paved 1.2-mile path, or for more of a challenge, similar views can be found on Andrews Bald Trail.

North Dakota: Painted Canyon Nature Trail

In Theodore Roosevelt National Park, this simple 1.1-mile loop offers views of the colorful Painted Canyon. For wildlife seekers, bison can also often be seen from the trail.

Ohio: Blue Hen to Buttermilk Falls Trail

This 1.6-mile hike in Cuyahoga National Park features not one, but two rushing waterfalls. If you’re feeling ambitious, it’s also a popular path for runners.

Oklahoma: Mount Scott Overlook

This out-and-back trail is just under 3 miles of paved road to the top, so it’s a good choice if you’re looking for easier terrain (although it’s still relatively steep). The top features views of the landscape, and it’s a great place to stop and hang out for a picnic with fellow hikers.

Oregon: Multnomah Falls Trail

Surprisingly, the best hike in Oregon is not, in fact, the Oregon Trail (as the classic video game might lead people to believe). This breathtaking 2-mile trail in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area is even better, thanks to its views of Multnomah Falls and the Benson Bridge.

Pennsylvania: Bushkill Falls Red and Blue Trail

This popular 1.9-mile trail requires a $15 entrance fee, but it’s well worth it for its views of the namesake Bushkill Falls. (AllTrails reviewers suggest getting there early to avoid crowds, and be prepared for some cardio.)

Rhode Island: Cliff Walk

This paved trail takes Newport visitors on a 6.7 mile seaside journey. Set along the coastline, hikers will be able to check out some of the town’s most spectacular mansions from the back during their trek.

South Carolina: Carrick Creek Loop

Carrick Creek Falls is the prime feature of this 1.9-mile hike in Table Rock State Park. Along the way, hikers will come across creek crossings with and without bridges.

South Dakota: Cathedral Spires Trail

This trail features the incredible rock formations known as Cathedral Spires in Custer State Park. In the heart of Black Hills National Forest, the 1.6-mile trail is also in a favorite spot for rock climbing (naturally).

Tennessee: Charlies Bunion via Appalachian Trail

On this 8.6-mile trail, hikers will get a glimpse of plenty of wildflowers-and Charlies Bunyon itself. This mountain’s odd moniker comes from the boulder-like formation that protrudes just below the summit.

Texas: Sculpture Falls Hike at Barton Creek

About four miles long, this out-and-back trail is a dream destination for dog owners. At the end, you’ll find a swimming hole for the both of you, so bring your swimsuit (and water shoes to protect your feet from rocks).

Utah: Canyon Overlook Trail

Zion National Park is known as one of the most spectacular destinations in the country, and this 1-mile out-and-back trail offers visitors an incredible taste of the region (without overly challenging terrain). There are handrails in many steep places along the trail but fair warning: Considering its incredible vantage of Zion Canyon from above, it’s not for those with a fear of heights.

Vermont: Little Rock Pond via Long Trail

In Vermont’s Green Mountain National Forest, visitors to this 4.8-mile trail can enjoy more than hiking. It’s also a favorite spot for fishing and camping and has all the makings of a perfect outdoor weekend adventure.

Virigina: White Oak Canyon

If you want a challenge and some alone time, this 9.5-mile trail in Shenandoah National Park is usually only moderately trafficked-probably because it’s rated as difficult. But this waterfall will more than make up for the extra effort.

Washington: Ozette Triangle Trail

Set on the Olympic peninsula, this 9.4-mile loop explores both Washington’s famously verdant forest and its rocky coastline. A little over three miles in, you’ll hit the beach of Cape Alava, which just so happens to be the westernmost point in the continental United States. (As you can see, it’s the perfect spot to set up camp for a while with a portable hammock.)

West Virginia: Loudoun Heights Trail to Split Rock Trail

This 6.6-mile loop is located in what was named after The Battle of Loudoun Heights during the Civil War. It overlooks the historic town of Harpers Ferry, with its 19th-century buildings and architecturally interesting bridges.

Wisconsin: Devil’s Lake Loop

Set in Devil’s State Park, this trail is aptly named: The 4.8-mile hike is devilishly steep. But it’s worth the sweat when you get to the top, thanks to incredible views of various unique rock formations and Devil’s Lake below.

Wyoming: Jenny Lake Trail

Head counterclockwise around Jenny Lake, and you’ll be treated to beautiful vistas of the surrounding Grand Tetons National Park. Along the 7.4-mile loop, you’ll spot waterfalls and wildlife, but beware-that may include grizzly bears, so make noise as you hike to avoid startling them.

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