The most historic hotel in every state



Slide 1 of 51: The history of the United States might not be as old as that of other countries in the world but it's just as storied. Although not necessarily the oldest, all of these hotels have left a significant mark on American history and played a part in the development and growth of this great nation. Read on to find out more about America's most historic hotels.
Slide 2 of 51: There's been a hotel on this site since 1852 when the first Battle House Hotel was opened on the site of a former military headquarters. The hotel has hosted notable guests throughout the years including Oscar Wilde, Winfield Scott and Millard Fillmore as well as Stephen A. Douglas on the night when he lost the presidency to Abraham Lincoln. It was during his stay at the hotel, he gave his famous statement that "the United States will never again seek one additional foot of territory by conquest".
Slide 3 of 51: Located in the heart of downtown Anchorage, the Historic Anchorage Hotel dates back to the 1930s. First opened in 1916, the hotel and the building have seen a lot of changes throughout the decades, including lack of maintenance in the 1950s that led to the demolition of the original building in the 1960s. Famously, artist Sydney Laurence once exchanged a painting of Mount McKinley for a year's rent. The hotel is also said to be haunted by some of Anchorage's historical figures including the city's first chief of police Jack Sturgus.
Slide 4 of 51: The Wigwam was built by The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company in 1929 as lodging for local ranch suppliers when Goodyear still used cotton in its tires. Today, it's a luxury resort. The first nine-hole golf course opened in 1930 and the rest of The Wigwam continued to expand to its current size of 331 rooms, three golf courses, nine tennis courts and three swimming pools. Although it has steadily grown over the past 85 years, a portion of the original structure – The Organizational House – remains largely unchanged.
Slide 5 of 51: With its elaborately decorated Victorian façade and ground-level bay windows, it's impossible to miss the Capital Hotel when in Little Rock. Opened in 1876, the hotel has hosted everyone from presidents to film stars and even Ulysses S. Grant's horse. In 2007, a $24 million (£18.9m) renovation project funded by local banking billionaire Warren Stephens gave the hotel a new lease of life and now features a restaurant run by a James Beard Award-winning chef.
Slide 6 of 51: Among some of the most iconic hotels in America, The Beverly Hills Hotel is where Humphrey Bogart and Marlene Dietrich spent a lot of their free time, where John Lennon and Yoko Ono went to escape the press and where Nixon's chief of staff learned about Watergate. The hotel is also notable due to its unique Mediterranean Revival style and the carefully designed rooms and bungalows with peachy pink interiors and palm leaf motifs. Some will also recognize it as the cover of the legendary Eagles album Hotel California.
Slide 7 of 51: Experience the true Wild West at the Strater Hotel. Built in 1887, the hotel building is adorned with handcrafted woodwork and holds the largest collection of American Victorian walnut antiques in the world. Located two blocks north of Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, the hotel has deep roots in Colorado's Gold Rush and silver mining heritage.
Slide 8 of 51: More of a luxury hotel than an inn, the Inn at Middletown has a long history that dates back to 1810 when the building was the grand home of the president of Middletown National Bank. Surrounded by Main Street's shops, boutiques and restaurants, the hotel perfectly captures old-school New England charm and now has 100 rooms, a high-end restaurant and an indoor pool.
Slide 9 of 51: Built in 1913 to rival the grandeur of Europe's finest hotels, a team of 18 European craftsmen spent two years working on the marble and carved-wood interiors as well as the artisan ceilings. Owned by one of the most esteemed families in Delaware, sharing the hotel's name, a recent renovation has ensured Hotel DuPont remains one of the finest spots in the country. Its DuPont Theatre has the fourth-largest stage in America, the Green Room restaurant has earned a AAA Four Diamond rating and its guest rooms have hosted many US presidents, including Warren Harding, JFK and Obama.
Slide 10 of 51: Occupying a cozy spot on Key West's historic Duvall Street, The Southernmost House is, as the name suggests, the southernmost hotel in the continental United States. The charming beach hotel was built in 1896 and has hosted many famous names including Louis Armstrong, Truman Capote and Ernest Hemingway. The oceanfront portion of the property, including the pier, is great for a sunset stroll while the open-air restaurant has a laid-back, tiki-style atmosphere. Find our full guide to Key West and the rest of the Florida Keys here.
Slide 11 of 51: The essence of Southern hospitality is captured in every aspect of the stunning Hamilton-Turner Inn boutique hotel in historic Savannah. A gorgeous mansion built in 1873, it was owned by Samuel Pugh Hamilton, a businessman who also served on the staff of a Confederate colonel during the Civil War. Today, the small hotel has 17 antique-filled luxury rooms and is located on Lafayette Square right in the heart of the historic district.
Slide 12 of 51: The pink-hued Royal Hawaiian has been attracting visitors since 1927 when it first opened as a 400-room luxury resort. A stand-out among the rest of the oceanfront properties, the hotel went on to serve as a major rest and recuperation center for soldiers and sailors in the Pacific during the Second World War. Since the war, it's gone through several major renovation projects including the addition of the Royal Tower wing in the 1960s and the new Mailani Tower wing in 2015. Locally known as the pink palace, it also offers free tours of the historic building.
Slide 13 of 51: Dedicated ski lodges were unheard of up until the Sun Valley Lodge opened in 1936. Built in a Bavaria inn-style, the 105-room resort sits in the Sun Valley, surrounded by Dollar and Bald Mountains. The hotel went through a large renovation project in 2016, making the country's first destination ski lodge a must-visit not only in winter but also in summer, when guests can enjoy horseback riding, fly-fishing and hiking.
Slide 14 of 51: This opulent Chicago landmark was built as a wedding gift from business magnate Potter Palmer to his bride Bertha Honoré for their wedding in 1871. The original building burned down 13 days later during the Great Chicago Fire but Palmer rebuilt it and reopened the hotel in 1873. It was the city's first hotel with electric light bulbs and phones in the guest rooms. It's also hosted US presidents and celebrities including Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra.
Slide 15 of 51: Opened by Dr William Bowles as a wellness retreat (thanks to its proximity to the therapeutic water of Pluto Mineral Springs), the French Lick Springs Hotel was a popular retreat for the wealthy during the 1920s. The 200-foot lobby atrium is an impressive sight and the hotel has hosted everything from the PGA Championship to being the unofficial home of the Democratic party in the 1930s. Although it's not the most famous hotel in the Midwest, it's still a popular destination for golfing, spa weekends and conventions.
Slide 16 of 51: The history of Hotel Julien Dubuque can be traced as far back as 1839 when the first lodging house opened on this site. The current hotel building was completed in 1915 and allegedly served as a hiding place for the notorious mobster Al Capone when things got complicated in Chicago. During his time as the leader of the mob, Capone reportedly also owned the hotel at one point and had an underground garage in the area in order to hide his personal cars.
Slide 17 of 51: There really isn't much the Midland Railroad Hotel hasn't seen in its time. Opened in 1899, it was a popular stop along the Union Pacific Railroad between Kansas City and Denver; during the Great Depression the hotel's third floor was turned into a chicken coop in order to serve dinner guests; and although it continued operating over the next decades, it closed in 1978. The historic building fell into disrepair until it was bought by the Wilson Foundation in 1997 who restored it to its former 1920s glory.
Slide 18 of 51: When the hotel was opened in 1923, there wasn't much to Downtown Louisville. However, the opening of this Old World-style hotel, with chandeliers and plush interiors, inspired a boom in theaters, offices and restaurants until it eventually grew to a place to see and be seen in the week leading up to the Kentucky Derby. In the coming years the hotel served as a gathering place during the great Ohio River flood of 1937 and a first-stop home for the Second World War soldiers returning from Fort Knox.
Slide 19 of 51: Narrowing down the most historic hotel in Louisiana, especially in New Orleans, is no mean feat but it's the French Quarter's iconic Hotel Monteleone that's been among the best places to have a drink on Bourbon Street for a very long time. Opened by Sicilian immigrant Antonio Monetelone in 1886, the hotel is still owned by the family today. Writers like Capote and Hemingway used to hide out here while writing and taking an occasional break (or two) at the legendary Carousel Bar which is, as the name implies, a carousel. Find our full guide to the Big Easy here.
Slide 20 of 51: The Westin Portland Harborview was the largest hotel in New England when it opened in 1927 as the 369-room Eastland Park Hotel. It has gone down in history as the place that didn't let Eleanor Roosevelt stay there with her dog and later became famous for Ozzy Osbourne tossing pool furniture off the rooftop. The hotel fell into disrepair until 2011 when it underwent a $50 million (£39m) renovation project and reopened under the current name.
Slide 21 of 51: A Baltimore destination since 1928, Lord Baltimore Hotel features perfectly preserved and restored 1920s interiors with a magnificent lobby, vaulted fresco ceiling and Murano glass chandeliers. Figures like Martin Luther King Jr have stayed at the hotel and the murals in the Calvert Ballroom are one of a kind. In 1982, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Slide 22 of 51: Omni Parker House, built in 1927 where the original stood in 1855, claims to be the longest continuously-operating hotel in the United States and has seen its fair share of history. Emeril Lagasse, Malcolm X and Ho Chi Minh reportedly all worked here while the guest list features people like Babe Ruth, FDR and Henry David Thoreau. Read our full guide to Boston here.
Slide 23 of 51: Visiting the Grand Hotel feels like stepping back in time – cars are banned from Mackinac Island so horse-drawn carriages or bicycles are the preferred mode of transport. The hotel itself, opened in 1887, claims to have the world's longest front porch, measuring 660 feet (201m), where guests and non-guests mingle from May to October. Mark Twain used this as a regular location on his speaking tours of the Midwest and the first public demonstration of Thomas Edison's phonograph was hosted by the hotel as well.
Slide 24 of 51: St. James Hotel in Red Wing has only had three owners since it opened in 1875. A more humble hotel in comparison to some of the others on the list, this hotel is all about the local community and family connections. Throughout the years, the hotel has hosted everyone from former US presidents to Bob Dylan.
Slide 25 of 51: Not a nod to the presidential home but to its founder's name, White House Hotel was established by Cora White, the wife of Gulf Coast lawyer and later judge Walter White, as she started accepting boarders in their home in Biloxi in the 1890s. Business was good so the Whites bought the house next door and joined the two together to create a lobby, a dining room and a ballroom in 1910. Recently restored thanks to the two White sons, the hotel has regained its former glory and seen the addition of the center and east wings.
Slide 26 of 51: Opened in 1926 during a construction boom in Kansas City, the hotel operated as the President Hotel until it closed in 1980. During its history, it served as the headquarters for the Republican National Convention that nominated Herbert Hoover for president in 1928. The hotel's Drum Room lounge famously attracted performers from all over the country including Benny Goodman and Frank Sinatra. The hotel reopened in 2005 as a Hilton hotel.
Slide 27 of 51: Designed after the Hotel Astor in New York City, the Hotel Finlen stands on the site where the old McDermott Hotel stood. The copper mining boom fueled the visitor flow to Butte, which was the largest town between Chicago and San Francisco at the time, so when James Finlen purchased the McDermott in 1902, he immediately tore it down and built a 200-room, nine-story Second Empire masterpiece that's still as elegant today as it was in Butte's heyday.
Slide 28 of 51: Omaha's most historic hotel, the Flatiron, is now an apartment building but Hotel Deco is almost equally significant to the city's history. An important piece in the city's artistic puzzle, the hotel's modern interiors have preserved as many of the original 1930s details as possible. It still stands as Nebraska's greatest Art Deco building and is one of only two AAA Four Diamond properties in the state. 
Slide 29 of 51: Opened in 1906 as Hotel Nevada, the Golden Gate remains the oldest continuously-operating hotel in Las Vegas. The hotel only has 122 rooms, which is an extremely small number by Las Vegas standards, and it still serves the 50-cent shrimp cocktail that was invented here – a parfait glass with shrimp on the rim and a dollop of cocktail sauce inside. However, the price has increased significantly since it was first served in 1959.
Slide 30 of 51: Wentworth by the Sea has been looking over the Atlantic since its opening in 1874. The 161-room hotel has been restored and rebranded as a Marriott Hotel & Spa but its history can still be felt within its walls and the three original Victorian towers. In 1905, delegates from Japan and Russia gathered here to sign a treaty to end the Russo-Japanese War and Teddy Roosevelt went on to win a Nobel Peace Prize for his role in the negotiations. 
Slide 31 of 51: Dating from 1816, the Congress Hall Hotel claims to be the oldest seaside resort in America. The lemon-yellow building in the Jersey Shore town of Cape May has been a favorite with notable figures throughout the history and president Benjamin Harrison liked it so much, he even made it his summer White House. Today the hotel has 108 rooms, a spa and a beach club across the street.
Slide 32 of 51: Located on Santa Fe's oldest square La Fonda, the current building wasn't erected until 1922 but some sort of lodgings has stood on these grounds since 1601, making it the oldest hotel site in America. The current hotel has 25-foot-high (7.6m) cathedral ceilings, stained-glass skylights and tin chandeliers. 
Slide 33 of 51: Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, The Sagamore opened in 1883, financed by several prominent Lake George summer residents. It was damaged by fire twice and today only one wing belongs to the original structure while the rest of the white clapboard building was finished in 1930. Through its history, The Sagamore has been a social gathering place for wealthy tourists and residents of Millionaires' Row – the stately mansions along Lake George's western shore.
Slide 34 of 51: When George Vanderbilt designed his stunning Asheville estate in 1889, he wanted to open an inn overlooking the splendor of the grounds. However, it never happened in his lifetime and it wasn't until 2001 when The Inn On Biltmore Estate opened, alongside the moderately priced Village Hotel and the Cottage, the only lodging here that dates back to Vanderbilt's time. 
Slide 35 of 51: Throughout its history, Hotel Donaldson has been a beacon of change in the city. After a fire ravaged most of Fargo, the hotel building was one of the first to be finished and opened in 1893. Then, after decades of disrepair, the restoration of the hotel revitalized the then-neglected Downtown. The opening of the new hotel sparked the area's revival and now the 17-room boutique hotel, with each room designed by a local artist, is a destination in itself.
Slide 36 of 51: The oldest continuously-run business in the state of Ohio, the Golden Lamb is another presidential favorite, having housed 12 of the former US presidents. It began as a simple tavern in 1803, providing a resting spot for travelers on their way from Cincinnati to the old National Road (now US-40). It offered simple rooms and stiff drinks, a tradition that hasn't changed much since it first opened.
Slide 37 of 51: The first skyscraper in Oklahoma City, the Colcord Hotel opened its doors in 1910. Despite several contemporary renovations, many of the original details have been preserved and the hotel still oozes the grandeur and the charm of the Roaring Twenties. The original marble columns and walls of the main lobby, the nickel and bronze letterbox and elevator doors, and the ornamental plaster ceiling look just as stunning today. 
Slide 38 of 51: If the exterior of Timberline Lodge seems familiar, it's probably because Stanley Kubrick used it as a stand-in for exterior shots of the notorious Overlook Hotel in his film The Shining. Built on Mount Hood's highest driveable location from 1936 to 1938, the Timberline Lodge is a popular spot with skiers and snowboarders. The hotel has comfy rooms and a spa, as well as the Blue Box Bar which is known for its wood-fired pizzas and Oregon craft beer.
Slide 39 of 51: Perhaps the most historic on this list, the Gettysburg Hotel is located within walking distance from the historic Gettysburg battlefield. Established in 1797, the hotel served as a temporary command center for president Eisenhower during his recovery from a heart attack in 1955. The hotel's Civil War Discovery package, which gives insights into the area's connection with the historic event, is extremely popular with guests.
Slide 40 of 51: One of the most popular destinations for beach holidays in the 19th century, Rhode Island was frequented by wealthy northeasterners and nothing brought in the crème de la crème like the Ocean House. Opened in 1868, this Victorian-style yellow-façade resort featured upscale rooms, croquet on the lawn and a cabana-lined beach. The original closed in 2003 but a replica was finished by 2010 and furnished with everything that was salvaged from the old property.
Slide 41 of 51: One of the top equestrian-training sites in America, Aiken and luxurious hotel The Willcox have been attracting high society horse-lovers since 1898. Established by British immigrant Frederick Willcox, the Colonial Revival-style white building is the epitome of Southern elegance. Home to the state's first running-water bathtub, the hotel has a very serious dress code and guests can be turned away for wearing the wrong type of shoes.
Slide 42 of 51: Construction on the Hotel Alex Johnson began the day before work started on Mount Rushmore and opened in 1928, spearheaded by railroad tycoon Alex Carlton Johnson. The Germanic Tudor architecture reflects the state's German immigrant heritage and there are plenty of nods to the Native American tribes of the area as well. The hotel is also famous for its ghost, the so-called Lady in White, a bride who allegedly jumped out of the window of room 812 in the 1970s.
Slide 43 of 51: A true Southern classic, The Peabody first opened in 1869 but was moved to a newer building at its present location in 1925. A unique tradition, that still continues to this day, began in the 1930s when ducks are placed in the hotel's lobby fountain. The resident ducks arrive twice a day via a red carpet to splash around.
Slide 44 of 51: Though The Driskill's façade is Roman, the rooms Victorian and the hand-laid marble floors feel Italian, this hotel is Texan through and through. Adorned with stuffed cattle heads, a nod to the hotel's original owner cattle baron Jesse Driskill, the hotel dating back to 1886 still remains Austin's go-to spot. The hotel has an extensive collection of art and has also hosted numerous governors' inauguration balls. It was also here that Lyndon B. Johnson awaited the results when he ran for president.
Slide 45 of 51: Built in 1910 by the Peery family to cater for those working in Utah's mining industry, The Peery Hotel is a Salt Lake City landmark. Famous for its gray and white exterior and prairie-style interiors, The Peery was remodeled in 1999 as a luxury boutique hotel.
Slide 46 of 51: More a resort than an inn, The Woodstock Inn dates back to 1793 when it began life as a tavern. Taking pride in its charming location in Woodstock, the luxe Colonial-style resort has a spa, an organic garden and an elegant restaurant. Established by Laurance and Mary Rockefeller, the inn was previously known as The Eagle Hotel. The name has been preserved in the hotel's logo and the large golden eagle carving mounted above the entrance.
Slide 47 of 51: The Homestead was founded in 1766 which means it's as old as the US itself. It's built on land in Hot Springs that contained seven natural mineral springs and Thomas Jefferson reportedly enjoyed a soak here in 1818. Today the hotel is a luxury resort with golf courses, zip lines and a spa with thermal treatments.
Slide 48 of 51: Although Seattle's oldest hotels can probably be found in Pioneer Square where rooms were sold for 25 cents to traveling miners, the Fairmont Olympic Hotel is where much of Seattle's social life has been taking place since 1924. Located on the original site of the University of Washington, this epic 450-room property is still much-loved by locals who come here to shuck oysters during happy hour at Shuckers.
Slide 49 of 51: A popular destination for travelers looking to take to the natural hot springs since its opening in 1778, The Greenbrier has been at the very center of American history. More than half of the 45 US presidents have stayed here and during the Second World War it housed diplomats from Germany, Japan and Italy before it was converted into a hospital for soldiers. In the 1950s, the US government built an emergency relocation center here – a massive underground shelter intended for the entire US Congress in case of a nuclear war.   Read more: The eeriest abandoned attraction to visit in every state and DC
Slide 50 of 51: Built in 1893 by businessman Guido Pfister, The Pfister is a Victorian masterpiece. Famous for its grand lobby and its trompe l'oeil ceiling, the 23-story tower (added in 1965) is a modern cocktail lounge offering scenic Lake Michigan views.  Read more: The world's most remote hotels
Slide 51 of 51: First opened in 1904, the remarkable Old Faithful Inn is the creative work of architect Robert Reamer who only used materials found in the park to build it. The lodgepole pine was cut four miles south of the site while 500 tons of rhyolite rock for the lobby chimney was quarried five miles away. The 327-room property is mere steps away from the world’s most famous geyser and while room rates aren’t exactly cheap, many of them offer front row seats for the eruption of the Old Faithful. Discover more about Yellowstone and northern Wyoming here.  Read more: America's most historic attractions from every decade

Historic lodgings

Alabama: The Battle House Renaissance Mobile Hotel & Spa, Mobile

There’s been a hotel on this site since 1852 when the first Battle House Hotel was opened on the site of a former military headquarters. The hotel has hosted notable guests throughout the years including Oscar Wilde, Winfield Scott and Millard Fillmore as well as Stephen A. Douglas on the night when he lost the presidency to Abraham Lincoln. It was during his stay at the hotel, he gave his famous statement that “the United States will never again seek one additional foot of territory by conquest”.

Alaska: Historic Anchorage Hotel, Anchorage

Located in the heart of downtown Anchorage, the Historic Anchorage Hotel dates back to the 1930s. First opened in 1916, the hotel and the building have seen a lot of changes throughout the decades, including lack of maintenance in the 1950s that led to the demolition of the original building in the 1960s. Famously, artist Sydney Laurence once exchanged a painting of Mount McKinley for a year’s rent. The hotel is also said to be haunted by some of Anchorage’s historical figures including the city’s first chief of police Jack Sturgus.

Arizona: The Wigwam, Litchfield Park

The Wigwam was built by The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company in 1929 as lodging for local ranch suppliers when Goodyear still used cotton in its tires. Today, it’s a luxury resort. The first nine-hole golf course opened in 1930 and the rest of The Wigwam continued to expand to its current size of 331 rooms, three golf courses, nine tennis courts and three swimming pools. Although it has steadily grown over the past 85 years, a portion of the original structure – The Organizational House – remains largely unchanged.

Arkansas: Capital Hotel, Little Rock

With its elaborately decorated Victorian façade and ground-level bay windows, it’s impossible to miss the Capital Hotel when in Little Rock. Opened in 1876, the hotel has hosted everyone from presidents to film stars and even Ulysses S. Grant’s horse. In 2007, a $24 million renovation project funded by local banking billionaire Warren Stephens gave the hotel a new lease of life and now features a restaurant run by a James Beard Award-winning chef.

California: The Beverly Hills Hotel, Beverly Hills

Among some of the most iconic hotels in America, The Beverly Hills Hotel is where Humphrey Bogart and Marlene Dietrich spent a lot of their free time, where John Lennon and Yoko Ono went to escape the press and where Nixon’s chief of staff learned about Watergate. The hotel is also notable due to its unique Mediterranean Revival style and the carefully designed rooms and bungalows with peachy pink interiors and palm leaf motifs. Some will also recognize it as the cover of the legendary Eagles album Hotel California.

Colorado: Strater Hotel, Durango

Experience the true Wild West at the Strater Hotel. Built in 1887, the hotel building is adorned with handcrafted woodwork and holds the largest collection of American Victorian walnut antiques in the world. Located two blocks north of Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, the hotel has deep roots in Colorado’s Gold Rush and silver mining heritage.

Connecticut: Inn at Middletown, Middletown

More of a luxury hotel than an inn, the Inn at Middletown has a long history that dates back to 1810 when the building was the grand home of the president of Middletown National Bank. Surrounded by Main Street’s shops, boutiques and restaurants, the hotel perfectly captures old-school New England charm and now has 100 rooms, a high-end restaurant and an indoor pool.

Delaware: Hotel Du Pont, Wilmington

Built in 1913 to rival the grandeur of Europe’s finest hotels, a team of 18 European craftsmen spent two years working on the marble and carved-wood interiors as well as the artisan ceilings. Owned by one of the most esteemed families in Delaware, sharing the hotel’s name, a recent renovation has ensured Hotel DuPont remains one of the finest spots in the country. Its DuPont Theatre has the fourth-largest stage in America, the Green Room restaurant has earned a AAA Four Diamond rating and its guest rooms have hosted many US presidents, including Warren Harding, JFK and Obama.

Florida: The Southernmost House, Key West

Occupying a cozy spot on Key West’s historic Duvall Street, The Southernmost House is, as the name suggests, the southernmost hotel in the continental United States. The charming beach hotel was built in 1896 and has hosted many famous names including Louis Armstrong, Truman Capote and Ernest Hemingway. The oceanfront portion of the property, including the pier, is great for a sunset stroll while the open-air restaurant has a laid-back, tiki-style atmosphere. Find our full guide to Key West and the rest of the Florida Keys here.

Georgia: Hamilton-Turner Inn, Savannah

The essence of Southern hospitality is captured in every aspect of the stunning Hamilton-Turner Inn boutique hotel in historic Savannah. A gorgeous mansion built in 1873, it was owned by Samuel Pugh Hamilton, a businessman who also served on the staff of a Confederate colonel during the Civil War. Today, the small hotel has 17 antique-filled luxury rooms and is located on Lafayette Square right in the heart of the historic district.

Hawaii: The Royal Hawaiian, Honolulu

The pink-hued Royal Hawaiian has been attracting visitors since 1927 when it first opened as a 400-room luxury resort. A stand-out among the rest of the oceanfront properties, the hotel went on to serve as a major rest and recuperation center for soldiers and sailors in the Pacific during the Second World War. Since the war, it’s gone through several major renovation projects including the addition of the Royal Tower wing in the 1960s and the new Mailani Tower wing in 2015. Locally known as the pink palace, it also offers free tours of the historic building.

Idaho: Sun Valley Lodge, Sun Valley

Dedicated ski lodges were unheard of up until the Sun Valley Lodge opened in 1936. Built in a Bavaria inn-style, the 105-room resort sits in the Sun Valley, surrounded by Dollar and Bald Mountains. The hotel went through a large renovation project in 2016, making the country’s first destination ski lodge a must-visit not only in winter but also in summer, when guests can enjoy horseback riding, fly-fishing and hiking.

Illinois: Palmer House, Chicago

This opulent Chicago landmark was built as a wedding gift from business magnate Potter Palmer to his bride Bertha Honoré for their wedding in 1871. The original building burned down 13 days later during the Great Chicago Fire but Palmer rebuilt it and reopened the hotel in 1873. It was the city’s first hotel with electric light bulbs and phones in the guest rooms. It’s also hosted US presidents and celebrities including Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra.

Indiana: French Lick Springs Hotel, French Lick

Opened by Dr William Bowles as a wellness retreat (thanks to its proximity to the therapeutic water of Pluto Mineral Springs), the French Lick Springs Hotel was a popular retreat for the wealthy during the 1920s. The 200-foot lobby atrium is an impressive sight and the hotel has hosted everything from the PGA Championship to being the unofficial home of the Democratic party in the 1930s. Although it’s not the most famous hotel in the Midwest, it’s still a popular destination for golfing, spa weekends and conventions.

Iowa: Hotel Julien Dubuque, Dubuque

The history of Hotel Julien Dubuque can be traced as far back as 1839 when the first lodging house opened on this site. The current hotel building was completed in 1915 and allegedly served as a hiding place for the notorious mobster Al Capone when things got complicated in Chicago. During his time as the leader of the mob, Capone reportedly also owned the hotel at one point and had an underground garage in the area in order to hide his personal cars.

Kansas: Midland Railroad Hotel & Restaurant, Wilson

There really isn’t much the Midland Railroad Hotel hasn’t seen in its time. Opened in 1899, it was a popular stop along the Union Pacific Railroad between Kansas City and Denver; during the Great Depression the hotel’s third floor was turned into a chicken coop in order to serve dinner guests; and although it continued operating over the next decades, it closed in 1978. The historic building fell into disrepair until it was bought by the Wilson Foundation in 1997 who restored it to its former 1920s glory.

Kentucky: The Brown Hotel, Louisville

When the hotel was opened in 1923, there wasn’t much to Downtown Louisville. However, the opening of this Old World-style hotel, with chandeliers and plush interiors, inspired a boom in theaters, offices and restaurants until it eventually grew to a place to see and be seen in the week leading up to the Kentucky Derby. In the coming years the hotel served as a gathering place during the great Ohio River flood of 1937 and a first-stop home for the Second World War soldiers returning from Fort Knox.

Louisiana: Hotel Monteleone, New Orleans

Narrowing down the most historic hotel in Louisiana, especially in New Orleans, is no mean feat, but it’s the French Quarter’s iconic Hotel Monteleone that’s been among the best places to have a drink on Bourbon Street for a very long time. Opened by Sicilian immigrant Antonio Monetelone in 1886, the hotel is still owned by the family today. Writers such as Capote and Hemingway used to hide out here while writing and taking an occasional break (or two) at the legendary Carousel Bar, which is, as the name implies, a carousel. Find our full guide to the Big Easy here.

Maine: The Westin Portland Harborview, Portland

The Westin Portland Harborview was the largest hotel in New England when it opened in 1927 as the 369-room Eastland Park Hotel. It has gone down in history as the place that didn’t let Eleanor Roosevelt stay there with her dog and later became famous for Ozzy Osbourne tossing pool furniture off the rooftop. The hotel fell into disrepair until 2011 when it underwent a $50 million renovation project and reopened under the current name.

Maryland: Lord Baltimore Hotel, Baltimore

A Baltimore destination since 1928, Lord Baltimore Hotel features perfectly preserved and restored 1920s interiors with a magnificent lobby, vaulted fresco ceiling and Murano glass chandeliers. Figures like Martin Luther King Jr have stayed at the hotel and the murals in the Calvert Ballroom are one of a kind. In 1982, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Massachusetts: Omni Parker House, Boston

Omni Parker House, built in 1927 where the original stood in 1855, claims to be the longest continuously-operating hotel in the United States and has seen its fair share of history. Emeril Lagasse, Malcolm X and Ho Chi Minh reportedly all worked here while the guest list features people like Babe Ruth, FDR and Henry David Thoreau. Read our full guide to Boston here.

Michigan: Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island

Visiting the Grand Hotel feels like stepping back in time – cars are banned from Mackinac Island so horse-drawn carriages or bicycles are the preferred mode of transport. The hotel itself, opened in 1887, claims to have the world’s longest front porch, measuring 660 feet, where guests and non-guests mingle from May to October. Mark Twain used this as a regular location on his speaking tours of the Midwest and the first public demonstration of Thomas Edison’s phonograph was hosted by the hotel as well.

Minnesota: St. James Hotel, Red Wing

St. James Hotel in Red Wing has only had three owners since it opened in 1875. A more humble hotel in comparison to some of the others on the list, this hotel is all about the local community and family connections. Through the years, the hotel has hosted everyone from former US presidents to Bob Dylan.

Mississippi: White House Hotel, Biloxi

Not a nod to the presidential home but to its founder’s name, White House Hotel was established by Cora White, the wife of Gulf Coast lawyer and later judge Walter White, as she started accepting boarders in their home in Biloxi in the 1890s. Business was good so the Whites bought the house next door and joined the two together to create a lobby, a dining room and a ballroom in 1910. Recently restored thanks to the two White sons, the hotel has regained its former glory and seen the addition of the center and east wings.

Missouri: Hotel President, Kansas City

Opened in 1926 during a construction boom in Kansas City, the hotel operated as the President Hotel until it closed in 1980. During its history, it served as the headquarters for the Republican National Convention that nominated Herbert Hoover for president in 1928. The hotel’s Drum Room lounge famously attracted performers from all over the country including Benny Goodman and Frank Sinatra. The hotel reopened in 2005 as a Hilton hotel.

Montana: Hotel Finlen, Butte

Designed after the Hotel Astor in New York City, the Hotel Finlen stands on the site where the old McDermott Hotel stood. The copper mining boom fueled the visitor flow to Butte, which was the largest town between Chicago and San Francisco at the time, so when James Finlen purchased the McDermott in 1902, he immediately tore it down and built a 200-room, nine-story Second Empire masterpiece that’s still as elegant today as it was in Butte’s heyday.

Nebraska: Hotel Deco, Omaha

Omaha’s most historic hotel, the Flatiron, is now an apartment building but Hotel Deco is almost equally significant to the city’s history. An important piece in the city’s artistic puzzle, the hotel’s modern interiors have preserved as many of the original 1930s details as possible. It still stands as Nebraska’s greatest Art Deco building and is one of only two AAA Four Diamond properties in the state. 

Nevada: Golden Gate Casino Hotel, Las Vegas

Opened in 1906 as Hotel Nevada, the Golden Gate remains the oldest continuously-operating hotel in Las Vegas. The hotel only has 122 rooms, which is an extremely small number by Las Vegas standards, and it still serves the 50-cent shrimp cocktail that was invented here – a parfait glass with shrimp on the rim and a dollop of cocktail sauce inside. However, the price has increased significantly since it was first served in 1959.

New Hampshire: Wentworth by the Sea, New Castle

Wentworth by the Sea has been looking over the Atlantic since its opening in 1874. The 161-room hotel has been restored and rebranded as a Marriott Hotel & Spa but its history can still be felt within its walls and the three original Victorian towers. In 1905, delegates from Japan and Russia gathered here to sign a treaty to end the Russo-Japanese War and Teddy Roosevelt went on to win a Nobel Peace Prize for his role in the negotiations. 

New Jersey: Congress Hall Hotel, Cape May

Dating from 1816, the Congress Hall Hotel claims to be the oldest seaside resort in America. The lemon-yellow building in the Jersey Shore town of Cape May has been a favorite with notable figures throughout the history and president Benjamin Harrison liked it so much, he even made it his summer White House. Today the hotel has 108 rooms, a spa and a beach club across the street.

New Mexico: La Fonda on the Plaza, Santa Fe

The current building wasn’t erected until 1922 but some sort of lodgings have stood on these grounds in Santa Fe’s oldest square since 1601, making La Fonda the oldest hotel site in America. The current hotel has 25-foot-high cathedral ceilings, stained-glass skylights and tin chandeliers. 

New York: The Sagamore Resort, Bolton Landing

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, The Sagamore opened in 1883, financed by several prominent Lake George summer residents. It was damaged by fire twice and today only one wing belongs to the original structure while the rest of the white clapboard building was finished in 1930. Through its history, The Sagamore has been a social gathering place for wealthy tourists and residents of Millionaires’ Row – the stately mansions along Lake George’s western shore.

North Carolina: The Inn On Biltmore Estate, Asheville

When George Vanderbilt designed his stunning Asheville estate in 1889, he wanted to open an inn overlooking the splendor of the grounds. However, it never happened in his lifetime and it wasn’t until 2001 when The Inn On Biltmore Estate opened, alongside the moderately priced Village Hotel and the Cottage, the only lodging here that dates back to Vanderbilt’s time. 

North Dakota: Hotel Donaldson, Fargo

Throughout its history, Hotel Donaldson has been a beacon of change in the city. After a fire ravaged most of Fargo, the hotel building was one of the first to be finished and opened in 1893. Then, after decades of disrepair, the restoration of the hotel revitalized the then-neglected Downtown. The opening of the new hotel sparked the area’s revival and now the 17-room boutique hotel, with each room designed by a local artist, is a destination in itself.

Ohio: Golden Lamb, Lebanon

The oldest continuously-run business in the state of Ohio, the Golden Lamb is another presidential favorite, having housed 12 of the former US presidents. It began as a simple tavern in 1803, providing a resting spot for travelers on their way from Cincinnati to the old National Road (now US-40). It offered simple rooms and stiff drinks, a tradition that hasn’t changed much since it first opened.

Oklahoma: Colcord Hotel, Oklahoma City

The first skyscraper in Oklahoma City, the Colcord Hotel opened its doors in 1910. Despite several contemporary renovations, many of the original details have been preserved and the hotel still oozes the grandeur and the charm of the Roaring Twenties. The original marble columns and walls of the main lobby, the nickel and bronze letterbox and elevator doors, and the ornamental plaster ceiling look just as stunning today. 

Oregon: Timberline Lodge, Government Camp

If the exterior of Timberline Lodge seems familiar, it’s probably because Stanley Kubrick used it as a stand-in for exterior shots of the notorious Overlook Hotel in his film The Shining. Built on Mount Hood’s highest driveable location from 1936 to 1938, the Timberline Lodge is a popular spot with skiers and snowboarders. The hotel has comfy rooms and a spa, as well as the Blue Box Bar which is known for its wood-fired pizzas and Oregon craft beer.

Pennsylvania: Gettysburg Hotel, Gettysburg

Perhaps the most historic on this list, the Gettysburg Hotel is located within walking distance from the historic Gettysburg battlefield. Established in 1797, the hotel served as a temporary command center for president Eisenhower during his recovery from a heart attack in 1955. The hotel’s Civil War Discovery package, which gives insights into the area’s connection with the historic event, is extremely popular with guests.

Rhode Island: Ocean House, Westerly

One of the most popular destinations for beach holidays in the 19th century, Rhode Island was frequented by wealthy northeasterners and nothing brought in the crème de la crème like the Ocean House. Opened in 1868, this Victorian-style yellow-façade resort featured upscale rooms, croquet on the lawn and a cabana-lined beach. The original closed in 2003 but a replica was finished by 2010 and furnished with everything that was salvaged from the old property.

South Carolina: The Willcox, Aiken

One of the top equestrian-training sites in America, Aiken and luxurious hotel The Willcox have been attracting high society horse-lovers since 1898. Established by British immigrant Frederick Willcox, the Colonial Revival-style white building is the epitome of Southern elegance. Home to the state’s first running-water bathtub, the hotel has a very serious dress code and guests can be turned away for wearing the wrong type of shoes.

South Dakota: Hotel Alex Johnson, Rapid City

Construction on the Hotel Alex Johnson began the day before work started on Mount Rushmore and opened in 1928, spearheaded by railroad tycoon Alex Carlton Johnson. The Germanic Tudor architecture reflects the state’s German immigrant heritage and there are plenty of nods to the Native American tribes of the area as well. The hotel is also famous for its ghost, the so-called Lady in White, a bride who allegedly jumped out of the window of room 812 in the 1970s.

Tennessee: The Peabody, Memphis

A true Southern classic, The Peabody first opened in 1869 but was moved to a newer building at its present location in 1925. A unique tradition, that still continues to this day, began in the 1930s when ducks were placed in the hotel’s lobby fountain. The resident ducks arrive twice a day via a red carpet to splash around.

Texas: Driskill Hotel, Austin

Though The Driskill’s façade is Roman, the rooms Victorian and the hand-laid marble floors feel Italian, this hotel is Texan through and through. Adorned with stuffed cattle heads, a nod to the hotel’s original owner cattle baron Jesse Driskill, the hotel dating back to 1886 still remains Austin’s go-to spot. The hotel has an extensive collection of art and has also hosted numerous governors’ inauguration balls. It was also here that Lyndon B. Johnson awaited the results when he ran for president.

Utah: The Peery Hotel, Salt Lake City

Built in 1910 by the Peery family to cater for those working in Utah’s mining industry, The Peery Hotel is a Salt Lake City landmark. Famous for its gray and white exterior and prairie-style interiors, The Peery was remodeled in 1999 as a luxury boutique hotel.

Vermont: The Woodstock Inn & Resort, Woodstock

More a resort than an inn, The Woodstock Inn dates back to 1793 when it began life as a tavern. Taking pride in its charming location in Woodstock, the luxe Colonial-style resort has a spa, an organic garden and an elegant restaurant. Established by Laurance and Mary Rockefeller, the inn was previously known as The Eagle Hotel. The name has been preserved in the hotel’s logo and the large golden eagle carving mounted above the entrance.

Virginia: Omni Homestead Resort, Hot Springs

The Homestead was founded in 1766 which means it’s as old as the US itself. It’s built on land in Hot Springs that contained seven natural mineral springs and Thomas Jefferson reportedly enjoyed a soak here in 1818. Today the hotel is a luxury resort with golf courses, zip lines and a spa with thermal treatments.

Washington: Fairmont Olympic Hotel, Seattle

Although Seattle’s oldest hotels can probably be found in Pioneer Square where rooms were sold for 25 cents to traveling miners, the Fairmont Olympic Hotel is where much of Seattle’s social life has been taking place since 1924. Located on the original site of the University of Washington, this epic 450-room property is still much-loved by locals who come here to shuck oysters during happy hour at Shuckers.

West Virginia: The Greenbrier, White Sulphur Springs

A popular destination for travelers looking to take to the natural hot springs since its opening in 1778, The Greenbrier has been at the very center of American history. More than half of the 45 US presidents have stayed here and during the Second World War it housed diplomats from Germany, Japan and Italy before it was converted into a hospital for soldiers. In the 1950s, the US government built an emergency relocation center here – a massive underground shelter intended for the entire US Congress in case of a nuclear war. 

Wisconsin: The Pfister Hotel, Milwaukee

Built in 1893 by businessman Guido Pfister, The Pfister is a Victorian masterpiece. Famous for its grand lobby and its trompe l’oeil ceiling, the 23-story tower (added in 1965) is a modern cocktail lounge offering scenic Lake Michigan views.

Wyoming: Old Faithful Inn, Yellowstone National Park

First opened in 1904, the remarkable Old Faithful Inn is the creative work of architect Robert Reamer who only used materials found in the park to build it. The lodgepole pine was cut four miles south of the site while 500 tons of rhyolite rock for the lobby chimney was quarried five miles away. The 327-room property is mere steps away from the world’s most famous geyser and while room rates aren’t exactly cheap, many of them offer front row seats for the eruption of the Old Faithful. Discover more about Yellowstone and northern Wyoming here.

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