Japan has a hotel made entirely of ice, and it's a real-life winter wonderland

Get into the Halloween spirit with a stay at one of America’s most haunted hotels, where ghosts, ghouls and bumps in the night come as standard. From grand rural resorts to historic city-center hotels, these ancient crash-pads are sure to be an absolute scream...
A sprawling building near the shoreline of Table Bay, the Castle of Good Hope dates back to 1666, making it the oldest colonial building in South Africa. Originally built by the Dutch East India Company as a replenishment station for ships, the site also served as a military fortress and prison during the Second Boer War from 1899-1902. Today, you can tour the fort's many rooms and buildings (including the gruesome torture chamber) but you might want to prepare yourself for a ghost sighting. Back in the 1700s, Governor Pieter van Noodt condemned several men to be hanged to death; one of the men cursed the governor from the gallows, and van Noodt died of a heart attack later that day. According to the Castle of Good Hope's official website, his ghost has been haunting the battlements ever since.
Slide 1 of 12:  Japan is no stranger to  interesting hotels, but its latest, an "ice hotel" in the town of Shimukappu, might just take the cake. The Hoshino Resort Tomamu in Hokkaido is completely frozen from top to bottom. Besides fuzzy sleeping bags used at bedtime, everything in the resort is made of ice: rooms, baths, the lounge, and even the bar. But it's only open for a limited time during winter, so rooms - or rather, igloos - fill up quickly. Keep scrolling to see photos of the resort that may just inspire your next trip to Japan.
Slide 2 of 12:  The hotel is part of an "ice village" in which visitors can enjoy ice skating, food, drinks, and a warm-water rotenburo (outdoor hot spring baths).
Slide 3 of 12:  There's a dining hall, a soup restaurant, a "green" deli, and - of course - fresh sushi.
Slide 4 of 12:  Complete with ice chairs and an ice fireplace, Tomamu's café is a place to relax and unwind. And beyond drinks, it serves cheese fondue with iced vegetables.
Slide 5 of 12:  Temperatures at the snowy resort reach as low as -30°C (-22°F), according to their website.
Slide 6 of 12: The café also recommends books, and features ample room to cozy up in for a reading session.
Slide 7 of 12:  Ice skating is a popular one, of course. But Tomamu also offers skiing, snowmobiling, and ice fishing.
Slide 8 of 12:  There's a "Farm Christmas" celebration, complete with a Christmas tree and petting-zoo animals, as well as a Banana Boat to ride down the ski slopes, and a unique kind of "snow rafting" in which guests are pulled in an inflatable "tube" by a snow mobile.
Slide 9 of 12:  Japan is no stranger to  interesting hotels, but its latest, an "ice hotel" in the town of Shimukappu, might just take the cake. The Hoshino Resort Tomamu in Hokkaido is completely frozen from top to bottom. Besides fuzzy sleeping bags used at bedtime, everything in the resort is made of ice: rooms, baths, the lounge, and even the bar. But it's only open for a limited time during winter, so rooms - or rather, igloos - fill up quickly. Keep scrolling to see photos of the resort that may just inspire your next trip to Japan.
Slide 10 of 12: It also features a frozen, open-air lounge to kick back in for some stargazing.
Slide 11 of 12:  This year, the ice village is only open from December 10 to about mid-March. The village itself is free to visit, but room rates run about 23,000 yen per person for one night, which is roughly $205.
Slide 12 of 12:  Tomamu even has an ice church, designed to look like one seamless piece of ice. There's an ice altar, an ice cross, and a private road, sure to make any couple feel like they're walking through their own wonderland.Visit INSIDER's homepage for more.

Japan is no stranger to interesting hotels, but its latest, an “ice hotel” in the town of Shimukappu, might just take the cake.

The Hoshino Resort Tomamu in Hokkaido is completely frozen from top to bottom. Besides fuzzy sleeping bags used at bedtime, everything in the resort is made of ice: rooms, baths, the lounge, and even the bar.

But it’s only open for a limited time during winter, so rooms – or rather, igloos – fill up quickly.

Keep scrolling to see photos of the resort that may just inspire your next trip to Japan.

The Hoshino Resort Tomamu ice village in Hokkaido, Shimukappu, Japan, is totally frozen.

The hotel is part of an “ice village” in which visitors can enjoy ice skating, food, drinks, and a warm-water rotenburo (outdoor hot spring baths).

The ice village boasts over 20 sit-down restaurants, in addition to places for quick bites. Al fresco dining is also an option.

There’s a dining hall, a soup restaurant, a “green” deli, and – of course – fresh sushi.

There’s also the Ice Books & Chairs Café, which features ice bookshelves filled with (hopefully laminated) novels.

Complete with ice chairs and an ice fireplace, Tomamu’s café is a place to relax and unwind. And beyond drinks, it serves cheese fondue with iced vegetables.

Of course, it serves frozen drinks in glasses made of ice.

Temperatures at the snowy resort reach as low as -30°C (-22°F), according to their website.

The café also recommends books, and features ample room to cozy up in for a reading session.

The village also features a wide array of winter activities.

Ice skating is a popular one, of course. But Tomamu also offers skiing, snowmobiling, and ice fishing.

And is totally family-friendly.

There’s a “Farm Christmas” celebration, complete with a Christmas tree and petting-zoo animals, as well as a Banana Boat to ride down the ski slopes, and a unique kind of “snow rafting” in which guests are pulled in an inflatable “tube” by a snow mobile.

But the star of the show is undoubtedly the ice hotel, whose rooms are igloos complete with ice walls, beds, and furniture.

But the resort equips you with sleeping bags designed to accommodate “extreme cold,” so there’s no need to worry about getting chilly at night.

It also features a frozen, open-air lounge to kick back in for some stargazing.

Rooms fill up quickly, though, as the resort is only open for a limited time.

This year, the ice village is only open from December 10 to about mid-March. The village itself is free to visit, but room rates run about 23,000 yen per person for one night, which is roughly $205.

If you’re looking for a real-life winter wonderland, Hoshino Resort Tomamu is the place.

Tomamu even has an ice church, designed to look like one seamless piece of ice. There’s an ice altar, an ice cross, and a private road, sure to make any couple feel like they’re walking through their own wonderland.

Visit NSIDER’s homepage for more.

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