An abandoned castle on an island in the Hudson River was once a weapon-filled fortress. Here's what it's like to visit its crumbling remains.



Slide 1 of 44: 
 The abandoned
 Bannerman Castle sits on Pollepel Island in New York's Hudson
 River. 
 Once a fortress for weapons, the castle is only accessible by
 private boat. 
 The castle was built by Francis Bannerman, a 20th-century
 Scottish arms trader, but was abandoned in the 1950s. 
 In the early 1990s, the Bannerman Castle Trust led
 efforts to restore the castle and island to make it safe for the
 public to visit. It's been accessible since 2004. 
 Today, the facility hosts tours and as used as a theater
 venue. Here's what it looks like. 
 Visit Business
 Insider's homepage for more stories.
Slide 2 of 44: Bannerman Castle is on Pollepel Island, which is about 60 miles north of New York City.
Slide 3 of 44: The abandoned castle is visible from Metro-North Railroad's Hudson train line.
Slide 4 of 44: To get to the castle, I took a Lyft from the Manitou train station to Donahue Memorial park in the town of Cornwall, New York.
Slide 5 of 44: The park sits on the west side of the Hudson River. There, I met up with guides from the Bannerman Castle Trust, the group that oversees the preservation and maintenance of the castle.
Slide 6 of 44: A boat waited at the park's public dock.
Slide 7 of 44: I crammed into the boat with two guides and a handful of volunteer gardeners who do landscaping work on Pollepel Island.
Slide 8 of 44: It took less than 20 minutes to get to the castle. From the dock, its beautiful, sturdy-looking walls made the building appear almost functional.
Slide 9 of 44: But my guide told me that I absolutely could not go inside.
Slide 10 of 44: From the dock, we climbed 72 stairs to reach the island.
Slide 11 of 44: Closer up, I understood why it's not safe to enter the castle. My guide explained that the towers of the castle require external beams for support.
Slide 12 of 44: The braces are made of steel. Each individual section weighs 250 pounds.
Slide 13 of 44: But even with this support, there's still a risk that the walls could fall.
Slide 14 of 44: So all visitors must stay at least 100 feet away from the castle. "Observation decks" are set up around the castle at picturesque vantage points.
Slide 15 of 44: A history of accidental explosions and weather damage at Bannerman Castle have left it in this decrepit state.
Slide 16 of 44: 
 Source: 
 New York Times
Slide 17 of 44: Bannerman's sons took over the business when he died in 1918. But in 1920, a room full of gun powder exploded, shattering some of the windows.
Slide 18 of 44: 
 Sources: Hudson Highlands
 State Park Preserve, 
 New York Times, 
 Business
 Insider
Slide 19 of 44: 
 Source: 
 New York Times
Slide 20 of 44: 
 Source: 
 New York Times
Slide 21 of 44: 
 Source: 
 New York Times
 , 
 Bannerman
 Castle Trust, 
 Business
 Insider
Slide 22 of 44: 
 Source: 
 New York Times
 , 
 Bannerman
 Castle Trust
Slide 23 of 44: 
 Source: Bannerman
 Castle Trust
Slide 24 of 44: 
 Source: Bannerman
 Castle Trust
Slide 25 of 44: ... the Trust has stabilized the structure that served as the Bannerman family residence. That's now the island's visitor center.
Slide 26 of 44: The facade of the building also serves as the backdrop for the theater's stage.
Slide 27 of 44: Inside, visitors can find information about the island's past.
Slide 28 of 44: Modest exhibits explain the site's history before Bannerman built the castle there ...
Slide 29 of 44: ... and describe the castle's construction.
Slide 30 of 44: Drawings and documents about the castle and the Bannerman family are framed on the building's distressed walls.
Slide 31 of 44: Visitors can also see preserved fixtures from the castle, like this bathtub.
Slide 32 of 44: Props for plays at the island's theater venue get stored inside the residence as well.
Slide 33 of 44: In September, the theater was showing "Dracula" ...
Slide 34 of 44: ... so the furniture and decor in the visitor center had a spooky theme.
Slide 35 of 44: The center also has a gift shop that sells art and t-shirts.
Slide 36 of 44: Although the trust has restored parts of the castle since the '90s ...
Slide 37 of 44: 
 Source: The
 New York Times
Slide 38 of 44: 
 Source: The
 New York Times
Slide 39 of 44: Then more walls fell just a month later, during a January storm in 2010.
Slide 40 of 44: Wear and tear from the elements is visible on the walls that still stand.
Slide 41 of 44: On the way back from the castle, the boat took a spin around the island's perimeter.
Slide 42 of 44: From the water, we caught glimpses of other pieces of the abandoned fortress ...
Slide 43 of 44: ... including its deteriorated harbor.
Slide 44 of 44: From afar, it was especially clear that nature has already taken over many parts of this mysterious piece of history on the Hudson River.

Bannerman Castle is on Pollepel Island, which is about 60 miles north of New York City.

The abandoned castle is visible from Metro-North Railroad’s Hudson train line.

To get to the castle, I took a Lyft from the Manitou train station to Donahue Memorial park in the town of Cornwall, New York.

The park sits on the west side of the Hudson River. There, I met up with guides from the Bannerman Castle Trust, the group that oversees the preservation and maintenance of the castle.

A boat waited at the park’s public dock.

I crammed into the boat with two guides and a handful of volunteer gardeners who do landscaping work on Pollepel Island.

It took less than 20 minutes to get to the castle. From the dock, its beautiful, sturdy-looking walls made the building appear almost functional.

But my guide told me that I absolutely could not go inside.

From the dock, we climbed 72 stairs to reach the island.

Closer up, I understood why it’s not safe to enter the castle. My guide explained that the towers of the castle require external beams for support.

The braces are made of steel. Each individual section weighs 250 pounds.

But even with this support, there’s still a risk that the walls could fall.

So all visitors must stay at least 100 feet away from the castle. “Observation decks” are set up around the castle at picturesque vantage points.

A history of accidental explosions and weather damage at Bannerman Castle have left it in this decrepit state.

Francis Bannerman VI, an arms dealer who lived in Brooklyn, bought Pollepel Island in 1900. He wanted a place outside the city to store an arsenal of munitions, according to the New York Times, so he built the fortress and an accompanying harbor.

Source:
New York Times

Bannerman’s sons took over the business when he died in 1918. But in 1920, a room full of gun powder exploded, shattering some of the windows.

Forty-seven years later, the Bannerman family sold the island to New York State, according to the New York Times. It eventually became part of the Hudson Highlands State Park Preserve.

Sources: Hudson Highlands
State Park Preserve,
New York Times,


Business
Insider

In 1969, a fire destroyed much of the castle, leaving it unusable.

Source:
New York Times

After that, Pollepel Island was deemed unsafe and declared off-limits by the State of New York.

Source:
New York Times

But in 1992, Neil Caplan, a resident of nearby Beacon, New York, formed the Bannerman Castle Trust. The group raised money to restore the island; Caplan is now its executive director.

Source:
New York Times

,

Bannerman
Castle Trust,


Business
Insider

The Trust teamed up with New York’s Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation to open the island to the public in 2004.

Source:
New York Times

,

Bannerman
Castle Trust

Today, it serves as a theater, museum, and historical site.

Source: Bannerman
Castle Trust

Although the main castle is inaccessible …

Source: Bannerman
Castle Trust

… the Trust has stabilized the structure that served as the Bannerman family residence. That’s now the island’s visitor center.

The facade of the building also serves as the backdrop for the theater’s stage.

Inside, visitors can find information about the island’s past.

Modest exhibits explain the site’s history before Bannerman built the castle there …

… and describe the castle’s construction.

Drawings and documents about the castle and the Bannerman family are framed on the building’s distressed walls.

Visitors can also see preserved fixtures from the castle, like this bathtub.

Props for plays at the island’s theater venue get stored inside the residence as well.

In September, the theater was showing “Dracula” …

… so the furniture and decor in the visitor center had a spooky theme.

The center also has a gift shop that sells art and t-shirts.

Although the trust has restored parts of the castle since the ’90s …

… weather has still taken a toll on the structure in recent decades.

Source: The
New York Times

Much of the castle’s shell collapsed one night in December 2009.

Source: The
New York Times

Then more walls fell just a month later, during a January storm in 2010.

Wear and tear from the elements is visible on the walls that still stand.

On the way back from the castle, the boat took a spin around the island’s perimeter.

From the water, we caught glimpses of other pieces of the abandoned fortress …

… including its deteriorated harbor.

From afar, it was especially clear that nature has already taken over many parts of this mysterious piece of history on the Hudson River.

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