25 stunning photos of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Partners Statues—Walt Disney & Mickey Mouse at Magic Kingdom (Photo by Lauren Bowman)
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Slide 1 of 25: The annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is a beloved holiday tradition.Millions of people line the streets of New York City to watch enormous balloons and musical numbers.Here are 25 stunning photos of the festivities. Now in its 91st year, the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is almost as iconic as the Thanksgiving turkey itself. Before digging into heaping plates full of festive foods, 50 million people across the country gather to watch the broadcast of the parade. Another 3.5 million attend in person in New York City. Here are 25 stunning photos of the parade that show why it has become such a beloved tradition.
Slide 2 of 25: The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade began in 1924.
Slide 3 of 25: It has grown into an iconic holiday tradition.
Slide 4 of 25: Macy's famously refuses to divulge how much the parade costs to produce.
Slide 5 of 25:  Source:  NBC
Slide 6 of 25: Volunteer balloon handlers rehearse for the big day in empty parking lots.
Slide 7 of 25: Volunteers are all Macy's employees (or friends and family of an employee).
Slide 8 of 25: Navigating the massive floats through Manhattan's skyscrapers isn't easy.
Slide 9 of 25: The night before the parade, spectators can watch the larger-than-life characters being inflated.
Slide 10 of 25: The next morning, the event kicks off at the corner of 77th and Central Park West on Manhattan's Upper West Side.
Slide 11 of 25: The march begins with a symbolic ribbon-cutting ceremony.
Slide 12 of 25: Then, the balloons take flight down Central Park West before turning onto 6th Avenue and ending at Macy's in Herald Square.
Slide 13 of 25: The parade is broadcast across the country and watched by 50 million people.
Slide 14 of 25: And 3.5 million spectators fill the streets to watch in person.
Slide 15 of 25: People line up hours in advance to score a prime viewing spot.
Slide 16 of 25: Some even score an office window view along the route.
Slide 17 of 25:  Source:  New York Daily News
Slide 18 of 25: They still managed to have a bit of fun.
Slide 19 of 25: Marching bands come from across the country to perform.
Slide 20 of 25: Their coordinating movements and bright outfits make a splash.
Slide 21 of 25: Other featured performers include the Radio City Rockettes, who have been dancing in the parade since 1957.
Slide 22 of 25: There's always an impressive lineup of celebrity performers, too.
Slide 23 of 25: ...and Santa Claus, whose appearance signals the start of the holiday season.
Slide 24 of 25: The annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is a beloved holiday tradition.Millions of people line the streets of New York City to watch enormous balloons and musical numbers.Here are 25 stunning photos of the festivities. Now in its 91st year, the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is almost as iconic as the Thanksgiving turkey itself. Before digging into heaping plates full of festive foods, 50 million people across the country gather to watch the broadcast of the parade. Another 3.5 million attend in person in New York City. Here are 25 stunning photos of the parade that show why it has become such a beloved tradition.
Slide 25 of 25: Who can resist the holiday cheer?

The annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is a beloved holiday tradition. Millions of people line the streets of New York City to watch enormous balloons and musical numbers. Here are 25 stunning photos of the festivities.

Now in its 91st year, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is almost as iconic as the Thanksgiving turkey itself. Before digging into heaping plates full of festive foods, 50 million people across the country gather to watch the broadcast of the parade. Another 3.5 million attend in person in New York City.

Here are 25 stunning photos of the parade that show why it has become such a beloved tradition.

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade began in 1924.

It has grown into an iconic holiday tradition.

Macy’s famously refuses to divulge how much the parade costs to produce.

“Macy’s views the parade as a gift to the City of New York and the nation,” a parade spokesperson told NBC. “Like any good gift, you cut off the price tag when you give it, so we keep to that tradition as well.”

Source: NBC

Volunteer balloon handlers rehearse for the big day in empty parking lots.

Volunteers are all Macy’s employees (or friends and family of an employee).

Navigating the massive floats through Manhattan’s skyscrapers isn’t easy.

The night before the parade, spectators can watch the larger-than-life characters being inflated.

The next morning, the event kicks off at the corner of 77th and Central Park West on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

The march begins with a symbolic ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Then, the balloons take flight down Central Park West before turning onto 6th Avenue and ending at Macy’s in Herald Square.

The parade is broadcast across the country and watched by 50 million people.

And 3.5 million spectators fill the streets to watch in person.

People line up hours in advance to score a prime viewing spot.

Some even score an office window view along the route.

Last year, 3,000 police officers patrolled the parade.

Source: New York Daily News

They still managed to have a bit of fun.

Marching bands come from across the country to perform.

Their coordinating movements and bright outfits make a splash.

Other featured performers include the Radio City Rockettes, who have been dancing in the parade since 1957.

There’s always an impressive lineup of celebrity performers, too.

…and Santa Claus, whose appearance signals the start of the holiday season.

People of all ages can enjoy the floats, music, costumes, and revelry.

Who can resist the holiday cheer?

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