10 surprising places to find the Statue of Liberty


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Slide 1 of 9: The courthouse square in Paragould, Arkansas, was one of the first sites to use a Statue of Liberty replica to honor fallen veterans. Inaugurated on Veterans Day in 1924, it remembers local soldiers who died in France during World War I.
Slide 2 of 9: The Rio de Janeiro neighborhood of Vila Kennedy displays a statue commemorating the 1889 coup that led to Brazilian independence.
Slide 3 of 9: Visitors at the original Legoland theme park in Billund, Denmark, can see a Statue of Liberty made of Legos.
Slide 4 of 9: Even before the Statue of Liberty was dedicated, France revealed an official replica. It's now found in Paris on Île aux Cygnes near Pont de Grenelle.
Slide 5 of 9: Facing the Rainbow Bridge in Tokyo’s popular Odaiba neighborhood, this replica is a tribute not to America, but to Japan’s friendship with France. It’s one of several Statues of Liberty found in Japan.
Slide 6 of 9: Legend says that the copper used to create the statue in New York Harbor came from a mine near Karmoy, Norway. In 1986 the community unveiled a waterfront replica to honor the connection.
Slide 7 of 9: This bronze reproduction in front of an office building at 667 Madison Avenue in New York was made in 2011 from the statue’s original plaster model in Paris.
Slide 8 of 9: A copy of Salvador Dalí's version of the Statue of Liberty is found in the Spanish coastal town of Cadaqués, where he had a home. The surrealist's version has both arms extended holding torches, instead of one holding a tablet of law.
Slide 9 of 9: Known as the “lazy statue,” the figure on top of the Ethnography Museum in Lviv, Ukraine, is a rare example of a seated Statue of Liberty.

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3 Brasil Rio Replica Liberty Credit Robert Belot

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Liberty Statue In Front Of Eiffel Tower Paris France

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Estatua Libertad En Ot Cadaques Credit Costa Brava Tourist Board

Sculptural Composition With Sitting Statue Of Liberty At The Dome Of The Old House In Lviv Ukraine

A new Statue of Liberty museum opened last week in New York Harbor, but you don’t have to take a ferry to see Lady Liberty. Even before its dedication in 1886, replicas of the statue, officially called “Liberty Enlightening the World,” began to appear. Many tell important stories, says French scholar Robert Belot, an authority on the statue’s sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi and author of the new book “The Statue of Liberty: The Monumental Dream” (Rizzoli, $50). “All these replicas are very important. It is more than a statue. It’s more than a symbol of the United States.”

a statue of a person with Statue of Liberty in the background

In honor of the museum’s opening (libertyellisfoundation.org), he shares some favorites with Larry Bleiberg for USA TODAY.

Paris

Standing near the Eiffel Tower, this official replica was created before the original monument was unveiled in New York.

“The statue is looking to the west, in the direction of the United States,” Belot says. The artwork sits on Île aux Cygnes in the Seine, near Pont de Grenelle. “It’s very beautiful. It’s part of the landscape.” en.parisinfo.com

Ethnography Museum, Lviv, Ukraine

Apparently even Lady Liberty needs to take a load off. Known as the “lazy statue,” this is a rare example of a seated Statue of Liberty. She can be found on the museum’s exterior, relaxing on top of its dome. Created by a Polish sculptor in 1910, it’s unclear what message he was trying to send.

“There are so many mysteries to these replicas,” Belot says.lviv.travel

Paragould, Arkansas

Since its debut, the statue has taken on different meanings. This replica in a courthouse square in northeastern Arkansas was one of the first to use the monument to honor fallen soldiers. Inaugurated on Veterans Day in 1924, it remembers local servicemen who died during World War I.

“It is very important. It says we were fighting not against Germans, but for liberty,” Belot says. arkansas.com

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Cadaqués, Spain

Over the years, the statue has inspired many artists, including surrealist Salvador Dalí, who designed his own statue with both arms holding torches, instead of one cradling a tablet of law. Belot believes Dalí was reinterpreting the Statue of Liberty’s original meaning.

“I think he destroyed the tablet because artists don’t want to be limited by laws,” he says.

The statue is a copy of one Dalí made earlier. en.costabrava.org

667 Madison Avenue, New York

This bronze reproduction was made in 2011 from the statue’s original plaster model in Paris. At one-sixteenth the original size, it’s found in front of a Manhattan office building.

“It’s incredible. It’s the last official replica. For me, it’s very important,” Belot says. 667madison.com

Window of the World, Shenzhen, China

As China began to embrace capitalism in the 1990s, it opened this theme park featuring models of world monuments.

“It was a turning point,” Belot says, noting that just a few years earlier the Chinese government had destroyed a figure resembling the Statue of Liberty during protests in Tiananmen Square. “It’s very important that it’s in China, even if it’s in an amusement park.” en.szwwco.com

Legoland, Billund, Denmark

You don’t need copper to create a Statue of Liberty. This example, constructed in 1968 from plastic Lego bricks, is just as evocative, Belot says.

“It’s a symbol now familiar to everyone in the world. I think Bartholdi would be very, very happy to see it.” legoland.dk

Vila Kennedy, Rio de Janeiro

This South American monument commemorates an 1889 coup that led to Brazilian independence. Belot says Bartholdi was sympathetic to the fight against slavery in Brazil, but when the author researched local archives, there was little information about the artist’s connection to the official bronze replica displayed in a Rio neighborhood. visit.rio

Karmoy, Norway

Legend says that the copper used to create the statue in New York Harbor came from a mine near this village in Norway, and in 1986 the community unveiled a waterfront replica to honor the connection. Although a fire destroyed mine records, Belot thinks the story’s probably true.

“Even if it is a myth, the statue is real.” visitnorway.com

Tokyo

Facing the Rainbow Bridge in Tokyo’s Odaiba neighborhood, this one-seventh replica is a tribute not to America, but to Japan’s friendship with France. Originally installed as a temporary display, it was so popular it became a permanent attraction. It’s one of several Statues of Liberty found in Japan. gotokyo.org

Slide 1 of 50: Kansas: Continue a road trip of seeing items that proclaim to be “the world’s largest” with a visit to “The World’s Largest Ball of Twine” in Cawker City.
Slide 2 of 50: Idaho: While driving through Blackfoot, road-trippers can stop by the Idaho Potato Museum, where you’ll find this gargantuan and photogenic potato sculpture.
Slide 3 of 50: Montana: Roamers can stop for some peace and quiet off of Highway 93 in Arlee at Ewam and Garden of One Thousand Buddhas.
Slide 4 of 50: Delaware: There are many Candy Kitchens in Delaware, but the one on the Coastal Highway in Rehoboth Beach qualifies as a fun roadside attraction with its larger-than-life lollipop garden and seating area.
Slide 5 of 50: South Carolina: As you drive through downtown Columbia, you’ll pass by the “World’s Largest Fire Hydrant,” created by the artist called Blue Sky.
Slide 6 of 50: Nevada: Though no longer on display, Seven Magic Mountains was an art exhibit in the desert of Sloan created by artist Ugo Rondinone.
Slide 7 of 50: North Dakota: Near the Turtle Mountains stands Tommy the Turtle. He is 30 feet tall, rides a 34-foot-long snowmobile, and was created by a man called Boots Reynolds.
Slide 8 of 50: New Mexico: You can’t miss McGinn’s Pistachio Tree Ranch while driving on Highway 54 through Alamogordo - the “World’s Largest Pistachio” is perched out front to ensure that!
Slide 9 of 50: Indiana: Built in the likeness of the Trylon and Perisphere from the New York World's Fair of 1939, this roadside attraction in Bruceville is a huge peach statue next to a small replica of the Washington Monument.
Slide 10 of 50: Mississippi: A humble house in Tupelo is now joined by a museum, an events center and a church, all an homage to this birthplace of music icon Elvis Presley.
Slide 11 of 50: Arizona: Enjoy a blast from the past as you drive through Williams, where you’ll find Flintstones Bedrock City, a theme park and campground tribute to the modern Stone Age family.
Slide 12 of 50: Colorado: One of the more well-known roadside attractions in America is this UFO Watchtower off of Highway 17 in Hooper.
Slide 13 of 50: Wyoming: Road-trippers can take a break from I-90 with a detour to the Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette. Find this museum behind the historical landmark that is this great pile of rocks!
Slide 14 of 50: Alabama: Sightseers don’t have to go all the way to NYC to view a Statue of Liberty. There is a miniature version of Liberty Enlightening the World off of I-458 in Birmingham.
Slide 15 of 50: North Carolina: A gigantic chest of drawers sits at the corner of Westwood   Avenue and Hamilton Street in High Point, “the home furnishings capital of the world.”
Slide 16 of 50: Connecticut: Passing through via I-95 or Route 1? Satisfy your sweet tooth and catch a fun photo-op with a detour to the Pez Visitor Center in Orange.
Slide 17 of 50: Vermont: These large whale tails make up the sculpture “Reverence” created by Jim Sardonis. They are located off of I-89 in South Burlington.
Slide 18 of 50: Oregon: What was once a large grain silo is now “The Peace Candle of the World” and a welcome sign to Scappoose.
Slide 19 of 50: Alaska: This Santa statue stands tall all year long outside Santa Claus House off of Route 2 in North Pole.
Slide 20 of 50: Minnesota: This Mary Tyler Moore statue in Minneapolis stands in the same spot where she threw her hat up in the air in the opening credits of the eponymous TV show.
Slide 21 of 50: Virginia: This large roller skate was originally created to showcase Hugo’s Skateway in Bealeton. The skating business has changed, but the skate still stands as a cute roadside sculpture on Route 17.
Slide 22 of 50: New Jersey: While cruising down Atlantic Avenue in Margate City, road-trippers will be pleased to spot this quirky roadside piece of history. Lucy the Elephant is a wooden figure standing 65 feet tall and is a National Historic Landmark.
Slide 23 of 50: Tennessee: Visible from I-40, the Memphis Pyramid has been around since 1991 and is now home to a Bass Pro Shop.
Slide 24 of 50: Louisiana: This statue of a frog raising his hat to you is a trekker’s welcome to the Frog Capital of the World, Rayne.
Slide 25 of 50: Missouri: Standing roundly next to City Hall in Brunswick (the state’s pecan capital) is this enormous pecan sculpture.
Slide 26 of 50: Texas: Driving through the Hill Country, sightseers may be surprised to spot this unique rock formation. It is an artist-created replica of the famous Stonehenge monument in England.
Slide 27 of 50: Iowa: Travelers can cross “seeing North America’s tallest working windmill” off their bucket list once they make a stop at the Vermeer Mill in Pella.
Slide 28 of 50: Illinois: The mausoleum at Resurrection Cemetery in Justice is home to one of the largest stained-glass windows in the world.
Slide 29 of 50: Florida: Shell-hunting is a must when visiting Florida’s beaches. This enormous conch is a fascinating find as you cruise past the Shell Bazaar on Highway 1 in Port St. Lucie.
Slide 30 of 50: Michigan: Originally built as a Ferris wheel for the 1964 World’s Fair in New York , this huge Uniroyal tire now greets drivers passing through Allen Park.
Slide 31 of 50: Pennsylvania: Originally built by Mahlon Haines to market his shoe business, this house off of Route 30 in York is now open to the public for tours and sweet treats.
Slide 32 of 50: South Dakota: This big chair in Deadwood, off of Route 385, is an awesome roadside attraction, even serving as the landmark for the local eatery out front.
Slide 33 of 50: Oklahoma: With a sign clearly labeling it as a “Route 66 Roadside Attraction”, this blue whale has been attracting visitors since 1972. Yes, it is also wearing a baseball cap.
Slide 34 of 50: Nebraska: Another “world’s largest” can be found by adventurers at the Time Capsule and Pyramid in Seward.
Slide 35 of 50: Kentucky: While driving through Corbin, foodies can feast their eyes on the birthplace of the famous Kentucky Fried Chicken at the restored Sanders Cafe.
Slide 36 of 50: Ohio: In Dublin, these huge concrete corn cobs were created by artist Malcolm Cochran as a tribute to the town’s agricultural history.
Slide 37 of 50: Maine: Named the "World's Largest Revolving/Rotating Globe" by the Guinness Book of World Records in 1999, a colossal globe spins at the DeLorme Maps Headquarters in Yarmouth.
Slide 38 of 50: Washington: Travelers will be pleased to find the “World’s Largest Radio Flyer” nestled behind the trees at Riverfront Park in Spokane.
Slide 39 of 50: Maryland: In the 1970s, Pastor Richard Green began building a replica of Noah’s Ark off of I-68 in Frostburg. It was never completed, but the structure is now a popular roadside attraction.
Slide 40 of 50: Utah: Roamers will see plenty of fun, colorful dinosaur statues in the Vernal City area, but for a more realistic view, take a detour to see these dinos at the Utah Field House of Natural History State Park Museum.
Slide 41 of 50: New York: Explorers will be happy to find the amusing and colorful delight that is the Coney Island Museum in Brooklyn.
Slide 42 of 50: Wisconsin: This enormous six-pack is the perfect landmark for the City Brewing Company in La Crosse.
Slide 43 of 50: Rhode Island: The Fantastic Umbrella Factory in Charlestown is an enchanting spot off Route 1 where travelers can stop to find a garden, a general store and a cafe.
Slide 44 of 50: Georgia: The “World’s Largest Tiger Sculpture” lives on the ground of Brenau University in Gainesville to represent the school’s Golden Tiger mascot. This statue clocks in at a height of 7 feet, 6 inches, and a weight of over 2,000 pounds.
Slide 45 of 50: Hawaii: Just off of Highway 132 in Pahoa is the Lava Tree State Monument, where adventurers can spend time amid the artful remains of the lava-affected forest.
Slide 46 of 50: New Hampshire: A minor detour from Highway 111 in Salem will lead you to America’s Stonehenge, a unique and mysterious area of man-made formations believed to be an astronomical calendar.
Slide 47 of 50: California: Northeast of San Francisco, you’ll find this colossal fiddle atop the Community Center of Fiddletown.
Slide 48 of 50: West Virginia: It’s hard to miss this extremely large and adorable teapot in Chester, just off of Route 30.
Slide 49 of 50: Massachusetts: Gardner is known for its big chairs. This big red chair on Elm Street is known as the Bicentennial Chair and clocks in at a height of 65 feet.
Slide 50 of 50: Arkansas: You can’t see Quigley’s Castle from the street, but it’s worth a detour to see the “Ozarks' Strangest Dwelling" in Eureka Springs. It is a house seemingly designed more for plants than humans.

Ks Twine Cawkercity

Id Potatomuseum Blackfoot

Mt Buddhas Arlee

De Candykitchen Rehobeth

Sc Firehydrant Columbia

Nv Magicmountains Sloan

Nd Tommyturtle Bottineau

Nm Pistachio Alamogordo

In Bigpeach Bruceville

Ms Elvispresley Tupelo

Az Flintstones Williams

Co Ufowatchtower Hooper

Wy Rockpile Gillette

Al Statueofliberty Birmingham

Nc Dresser Highpoint

Ct Pezvisitorscenter Orange

Vt Reverence Burlington

Or Peacecandle Scappoose

Ak Santa Northpole

Mn Marytylermoore Minneapolis

Va Rollerskate Bealeton

Nj Lucyelephant Margatecity

Tn Pyramid Memphis

La Frog Rayne

Mo Pecan Brunswick

Tx Stonehenge Ingram

Ia Vermeermill Pella

Il Stainedglass Justice

Fl Shellbazaar Portstlucie

Mi Uniroyaltire Allenpark

Pa Hainesshoehouse York

Sd Logchair Deadwood

Ok Whale Catoosa

Ne Timecapsule Seward

Ky Kfc Corbin

Oh Corn Dublin

Me Globe Yarmouth

Wa Radioflyer Spokane

Md Noahsarc Frostburg

Ut Dinomuseum Vernal

Ny Coneyislandmuseum Brooklyn

Wi Sixpack Lacrosse

Ri Umbrellafactory Charlestown

Ga Tigerstatue Gainesville

Hi Lavatreestatemonument Pahoa

Nh Stonehenge Salem

Ca Hugefiddle Fiddletown

Wv Largestteapot Chester

Ma Bicentennialchair Gardner

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This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: 10 surprising places to find the Statue of Liberty

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